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Differential output growth across regions and carbon dioxide emissions: Evidence from U.S. and China

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  • Wang, Chunhua

Abstract

This paper explores the importance of differential output growth across regions within a country in reducing the country's total carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. It proposes a framework that decomposes changes in emissions into sources attributable to 1) national growth rate of gross domestic product (GDP), 2) differential GDP growth across regions, 3) changes in energy intensity, and 4) changes in CO2 emission coefficient of energy. Data for China (1995–2009) and the United States (1990–2009) are analyzed. Uneven growth across regions reduced carbon dioxide emissions in both countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Chunhua, 2013. "Differential output growth across regions and carbon dioxide emissions: Evidence from U.S. and China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 230-236.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:energy:v:53:y:2013:i:c:p:230-236
    DOI: 10.1016/j.energy.2013.02.044
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    Cited by:

    1. Bosupeng, Mpho, 2015. "Drivers of Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: International Evidence," MPRA Paper 77925, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2015.
    2. Cicea, Claudiu & Marinescu, Corina & Popa, Ion & Dobrin, Cosmin, 2014. "Environmental efficiency of investments in renewable energy: Comparative analysis at macroeconomic level," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 555-564.
    3. Mallick, Hrushikesh & Padhan, Hemachandra & Mahalik, Mantu Kumar, 2019. "Does skewed pattern of income distribution matter for the environmental quality? Evidence from selected BRICS economies with an application of Quantile-on-Quantile regression (QQR) approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 129(C), pages 120-131.
    4. Díaz, Antonia & Marrero, Gustavo A. & Puch, Luis A. & Rodríguez, Jesús, 2019. "Economic growth, energy intensity and the energy mix," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 1056-1077.
    5. Antonia Díaz & Gustavo A. Marrero & Luis Puch & Jesús Rodríguez-López, 2018. "A Note on Growth, Energy Intensity and the Energy Mix: A Dynamic Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 18.08, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics.
    6. Mahmut Zortuk & Sinan Çeken, 2016. "Testing Environmental Kuznets Curve in the Selected Transition Economies with Panel Smooth Transition Regression Analysis," The AMFITEATRU ECONOMIC journal, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 18(43), pages 537-537, August.
    7. Padhan, Hemachandra & Haouas, Ilham & Sahoo, Bhagaban & Heshmati, Almas, 2018. "What Matters for Environmental Quality in the Next-11 Countries: Economic Growth or Income Inequality?," IZA Discussion Papers 11407, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Bosupeng Mpho, 2016. "The Effect of Exports on Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Policy Implications," International Journal of Management and Economics, Warsaw School of Economics, Collegium of World Economy, vol. 51(1), pages 20-32, September.

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