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Fat city: The relationship between urban sprawl and obesity

Author

Listed:
  • Jean Eid

    (University of Toronto)

  • Henry G. Overman

    (London School of Economics)

  • Diego Puga

    (Universitat Pompeu Fabra and IMDEA)

  • Matthew A. Turner

    (University of Toronto)

Abstract

We study the relationship between urban sprawl and obesity. Using data that tracks individuals over time, we find no evidence that urban sprawl causes obesity. We show that previous findings of a positive relationship most likely reflect a failure to properly control for the fact the individuals who are more likely to be obese choose to live in more sprawling neighborhoods. Our results indicate that current interest in changing the built environment to counter the rise in obesity is misguided.

Suggested Citation

  • Jean Eid & Henry G. Overman & Diego Puga & Matthew A. Turner, 2007. "Fat city: The relationship between urban sprawl and obesity," Working Papers 2007-01, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
  • Handle: RePEc:imd:wpaper:wp2007-01
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    urban sprawl; obesity; selection effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns

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