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The Balassa-Samuelson Effect in 'East & West'. Differences and Similarities


  • Wagner, Martin

    (Department of Economics and Finance, Institute for Advanced Studies, Vienna, Austria)


Based on two detailed Balassa-Samuelson (BS) studies, Wagner and Hlouskova (2004) for eight Central Eastern European countries (CEECs) and Wagner and Doytchinov (2004) for ten Western European countries (WECs), this study assesses the differences and similarities of the BS effect between these two country groups. The econometric results show that the BS effect may have been overestimated in previous studies due to application of inappropriate first generation panel cointegration methods. When appropriately quantified, the BS effect itself explains RER movements respectively inflation differentials only to a small extent. However, extended BS relationships that include additional variables allow for an adequate modelling of inflation. Based on the comparative analysis we draw some conclusions for monetary policy in the future enlarged Euro Area.

Suggested Citation

  • Wagner, Martin, 2005. "The Balassa-Samuelson Effect in 'East & West'. Differences and Similarities," Economics Series 180, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:180

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    9. Peter Pedroni, 2000. "Fully Modified OLS for Heterogeneous Cointegrated Panels," Department of Economics Working Papers 2000-03, Department of Economics, Williams College.
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    16. Jaroslava Hlouskova & Martin Wagner, 2006. "The Performance of Panel Unit Root and Stationarity Tests: Results from a Large Scale Simulation Study," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 85-116.
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    Cited by:

    1. Christian Dreger & Konstantin Kholodilin & Kirsten Lommatzsch & Jirka Slacalek & Przemyslaw Wozniak, 2007. "Price convergence in the enlarged internal market," European Economy - Economic Papers 2008 - 2015 292, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.

    More about this item


    Balassa-Samuelson effect; Central and Eastern Europe; Western Europe; Non-stationary panels; Inflation simulations;

    JEL classification:

    • F02 - International Economics - - General - - - International Economic Order and Integration
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General
    • P21 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Planning, Coordination, and Reform
    • P27 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Performance and Prospects

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