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The effects of taxes and bans on passive smoking

Author

Listed:
  • Jerome Adda

    () (Institute for Fiscal Studies and Bocconi University)

  • Francesca Cornaglia

    (Institute for Fiscal Studies and UCL)

Abstract

This paper evaluates the effect of excise taxes and bans on smoking in public places on the exposure to tobacco smoke of non-smokers. We use a novel way of quantifying passive smoking: we use data on cotinine concentration- a metabolite of nicotine- measured in a large population of non-smokers over time. Exploiting state and time variation across US states, we reach two important conclusions. First, excise taxes have a significant effect on passive smoking. Second, smoking bans have on average no effects on non smokers. While bans in public transportation or in schools decrease the exposure of non smokers, bans in recreational public places can in fact perversely increase their exposure by displacing smokers to private places where they contaminate non smokers, and in particular young children. Bans affect socioeconomic groups differently: we find that smoking bans increase the exposure of poorer individuals, while it decreases the exposure of richer individuals, leading to widening health disparities.

Suggested Citation

  • Jerome Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2005. "The effects of taxes and bans on passive smoking," CeMMAP working papers CWP20/05, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:cemmap:20/05
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    File URL: http://cemmap.ifs.org.uk/wps/cwp2005.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Chaloupka, Frank, 1991. "Rational Addictive Behavior and Cigarette Smoking," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 722-742, August.
    2. Chaloupka, Frank J. & Warner, Kenneth E., 2000. "The economics of smoking," Handbook of Health Economics,in: A. J. Culyer & J. P. Newhouse (ed.), Handbook of Health Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 29, pages 1539-1627 Elsevier.
    3. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2004:94:2:321-325_9 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Becker, Gary S & Grossman, Michael & Murphy, Kevin M, 1994. "An Empirical Analysis of Cigarette Addiction," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 396-418, June.
    5. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
    6. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "How Much Should We Trust Differences-In-Differences Estimates?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 249-275.
    7. Matthew C. Farrelly & William N. Evans & Edward Montgomery, 1999. "Do Workplace Smoking Bans Reduce Smoking?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(4), pages 728-747, September.
    8. Evans, William N. & Ringel, Jeanne S., 1999. "Can higher cigarette taxes improve birth outcomes?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 135-154, April.
    9. Philip DeCicca & Donald Kenkel & Alan Mathios, 2002. "Putting Out the Fires: Will Higher Taxes Reduce the Onset of Youth Smoking?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 110(1), pages 144-169, February.
    10. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2006. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1013-1028, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abel Brodeur, 2012. "Smoking, Income and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Smoking Bans," PSE Working Papers halshs-00664269, HAL.
    2. Michael L. Marlow, 2012. "Effectiveness of Massachusetts’ comprehensive tobacco control program," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(3), pages 373-385, January.
    3. Jérôme Adda & Francesca Cornaglia, 2006. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(4), pages 1013-1028, September.
    4. Michael Kvasnicka & Harald Tauchmann, 2010. "Much Ado About Nothing? – Smoking Bans and Germany’s Hospitality Industry," Ruhr Economic Papers 0172, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    5. repec:zbw:rwirep:0172 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Marianne P. Bitler & Christopher S. Carpenter & Madeline Zavodny, 2010. "Effects of venue‐specific state clean indoor air laws on smoking‐related outcomes," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(12), pages 1425-1440, December.
    7. Kvasnicka, Michael & Tauchmann, Harald, 2012. "Much ado about nothing? Smoking bans and Germany's hospitality industry," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 4539-4551.
    8. Origo Federica & Lucifora Claudio, 2013. "The Effect of Comprehensive Smoking Bans in European Workplaces," Forum for Health Economics & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 1-27, March.
    9. Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields & Stephen Wheatley Price & Jenny Williams, 2011. "Quantifying the cost of passive smoking on child health: evidence from children's cotinine samples," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 174(1), pages 195-212, January.
    10. Stephen Smith, 2008. "Restraining the Golden Weed: Taxation and Regulation of Tobacco," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 64(4), pages 476-507, December.
    11. Jason Abrevaya & Laura Puzzello, 2012. "Taxes, Cigarette Consumption, and Smoking Intensity: Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(4), pages 1751-1763, June.
    12. Sijbren Cnossen & D. Forrest & S. Smith, 2009. "Taxation and regulation of smoking, drinking and gambling in the European Union," CPB Special Publication 76, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.
    13. Abel Brodeur, 2012. "Smoking, Income and Subjective Well-Being: Evidence from Smoking Bans," Working Papers halshs-00664269, HAL.

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    JEL classification:

    • I1 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health
    • H - Public Economics

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