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Thank you for not smoking: evidence from the Italian smoking ban

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  • Paolo Buonanno
  • Marco Ranzani

Abstract

By 2030, tobacco is expected to be the cause of about 10 million deaths per year worldwide. In Italy tobacco smoking is still a pervasive and relevant phenomenon. Using data from a national health survey, we investigate how individuals react to the introduction of a public smoking ban in Italy. Our estimates suggest that the Italian smoking ban in private places open to the public reduced smoking prevalence by 1.3% and daily cigarettes consumption by 8%. We find heterogeneous effects by gender, marital status, and region of residence.

Suggested Citation

  • Paolo Buonanno & Marco Ranzani, 2012. "Thank you for not smoking: evidence from the Italian smoking ban," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 246, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  • Handle: RePEc:cca:wpaper:246
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    Cited by:

    1. Josten, Cecily & Lordan, Grace, 2020. "The interaction between personality and health policy: Empirical evidence from the UK smoking bans," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 38(C).
    2. Josten, Cecily & Lordan, Grace, 2020. "The Interaction Between Personality and Health Policy: Empirical Evidence from the UK Smoking Bans," IZA Discussion Papers 13322, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Fabrizio Mazzonna & Paola Salari, 2014. "Short term effects of public smoking bans on health," IdEP Economic Papers 1409, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
    4. Pieroni, Luca & Chiavarini, Manuela & Minelli, Liliana & Salmasi, Luca, 2013. "The role of anti-smoking legislation on cigarette and alcohol consumption habits in Italy," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(2), pages 116-126.
    5. Andrew K.G. Tan & Steven T. Yen & Abdul Rahman Hasan, 2016. "Cigarette and Alcohol Expenditures in Malaysia: Implications for Anti‐Smoking and Drinking Policies," Asian Economic Journal, East Asian Economic Association, vol. 30(4), pages 401-421, December.
    6. Fabrizio Mazzonna & Paola Salari, 2018. "Can a smoking ban save your heart?," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(10), pages 1435-1449, October.
    7. Pieroni, L. & Daddi, P. & Salmasi, L., 2013. "Impact of Italian smoking ban on business activity of restaurants, cafés and bars," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 121(1), pages 70-73.
    8. Anastase Tchicaya & Nathalie Lorentz & Stefaan Demarest, 2016. "Socioeconomic Inequalities in Smoking and Smoking Cessation Due to a Smoking Ban: General Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study in Luxembourg," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(4), pages 1-15, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    smoking; public smoking ban; quasi-natural experiment; individual behaviour;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • K32 - Law and Economics - - Other Substantive Areas of Law - - - Energy, Environmental, Health, and Safety Law

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