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Short term effects of public smoking bans on health

Author

Listed:
  • Fabrizio Mazzonna

    () (Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI) and MEA (Munich Center for the Economics of Ageing) at Max Planck Institute for Social law and Social Policy)

  • Paola Salari

    () (Università della Svizzera Italiana (USI))

Abstract

This paper evaluates the causal negative effect of environmental tobacco exposure on health by exploiting the time and geographical variation in public-place smoking bans implemented in Switzerland between 2007 and 2011. Using monthly data from the universe of Swiss hospitals between 2004 and 2012, we show that the incidence of acute myocardial infarction hospitalizations decreases by about 10-12% immediately after the law implementation. We also find evidence of heterogeneity by age and sex and across income and education groups. In particular, the policy affected mainly men aged 50+ and the regions characterized by a lower level of income and education.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabrizio Mazzonna & Paola Salari, 2014. "Short term effects of public smoking bans on health," IdEP Economic Papers 1409, USI Università della Svizzera italiana.
  • Handle: RePEc:lug:wpidep:1409
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Christopher Carpenter & Sabina Postolek & Casey Warman, 2011. "Public-Place Smoking Laws and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 35-61, August.
    2. Pieroni, Luca & Chiavarini, Manuela & Minelli, Liliana & Salmasi, Luca, 2013. "The role of anti-smoking legislation on cigarette and alcohol consumption habits in Italy," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 111(2), pages 116-126.
    3. Andrew M. Jones & Audrey Laporte & Nigel Rice & Eugenio Zucchelli, 2015. "Do Public Smoking Bans have an Impact on Active Smoking? Evidence from the UK," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(2), pages 175-192, February.
    4. Buonanno, Paolo & Ranzani, Marco, 2013. "Thank you for not smoking: Evidence from the Italian smoking ban," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(2), pages 192-199.
    5. Christopher Ruhm, 2007. "A healthy economy can break your heart," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 44(4), pages 829-848, November.
    6. Cawley, John & Markowitz, Sara & Tauras, John, 2004. "Lighting up and slimming down: the effects of body weight and cigarette prices on adolescent smoking initiation," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 293-311, March.
    7. Christopher Carpenter & Sabina Postolek & Casey Warman, 2011. "Public-Place Smoking Laws and Exposure to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS)," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 35-61, August.
    8. Sargent, R P & Shepard, R M & Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D., 2004. "Reduced incidence of admissions for myocardial infarction associated with public smoking ban: before and after study," University of California at San Francisco, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education qt3276d6r6, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, UC San Francisco.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    smoking bans; policy evaluation; infarction; hospital data; health inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • H75 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Government: Health, Education, and Welfare
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism
    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health

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