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Smoking Inequality across Genders and Socio-economic Classes. Evidence from Longitudinal Italian Data

Author

Listed:
  • Cinzi Di Novi

    (Department of Economics and Management, University of Pavia)

  • Rowena Jacobs

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York)

  • Matteo Migheli

    () (University of Turin, Collegio Carlo Alberto)

Abstract

There has been a dearth of literature on smoking inequalities, in spite of its contribution to health inequalities. We exploit longitudinal Italian individual-level data to identify the main socio-demographic characteristics that determine smoking inequalities. We use the Erreygers Concentration Index to identify in which groups smoking is relatively more prevalent. We find that, among men, pro-poor prevalence is driven by members of the lower socio-economic classes, while we observe the opposite for women. We encourage policymakers to address the issue of smoking inequalities, which the current policies have largely disregarded.

Suggested Citation

  • Cinzi Di Novi & Rowena Jacobs & Matteo Migheli, 2018. "Smoking Inequality across Genders and Socio-economic Classes. Evidence from Longitudinal Italian Data," DEM Working Papers Series 152, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:pav:demwpp:demwp0152
    as

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    File URL: http://economia.unipv.it/docs/dipeco/quad/ps/RePEc/pav/demwpp/DEMWP0152.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    5. Erreygers, Guido, 2009. "Correcting the Concentration Index: A reply to Wagstaff," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 521-524, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    smoking inequality; Italy; gender; social classes;

    JEL classification:

    • I14 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health and Inequality
    • I18 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Government Policy; Regulation; Public Health
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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