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The effect of cigarette taxes on smoking among men and women

  • Mark Stehr

    (Department of Economics, LeBow College of Business, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, USA)

The literature contains numerous studies that estimate the effect of cigarette taxes on smoking across various population groups. Although the conclusions are split, most US studies find that men are more responsive to cigarette taxes than women. This paper shows that these results are due to the failure to control for state-specific gender gaps in smoking rates that are correlated with cigarette taxes. When gender-specific state fixed effects are included to control for these gaps, the results indicate that women are nearly twice as responsive to cigarette taxes as are men. Since the econometric specification controls for variation in the tax response by household income, it is unlikely to be responsible for the difference. Copyright © 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 16 (2007)
Issue (Month): 12 ()
Pages: 1333-1343

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Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:16:y:2007:i:12:p:1333-1343
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  1. Barnett, Paul G. & Keeler, Theodore E. & Hu, Teh-wei, 1995. "Oligopoly structure and the incidence of cigarette excise taxes," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 457-470, July.
  2. Frank J. Chaloupka, 1990. "Men, Women, and Addiction: The Case of Cigarette Smoking," NBER Working Papers 3267, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Cragg, John G, 1971. "Some Statistical Models for Limited Dependent Variables with Application to the Demand for Durable Goods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 39(5), pages 829-44, September.
  4. Gruber, Jonathan & Sen, Anindya & Stabile, Mark, 2003. "Estimating price elasticities when there is smuggling: the sensitivity of smoking to price in Canada," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 821-842, September.
  5. William N. Evans & Jeanne S. Ringel & Diana Stech, 1999. "Tobacco Taxes and Public Policy to Discourage Smoking," NBER Chapters, in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 13, pages 1-56 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lewit, Eugene M. & Coate, Douglas, 1982. "The potential for using excise taxes to reduce smoking," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(2), pages 121-145, August.
  7. Matthew C. Farrelly & Jeremy W. Bray & Terry Pechacek & Trevor Woollery, 2001. "Response by Adults to Increases in Cigarette Prices by Sociodemographic Characteristics," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(1), pages 156-165, July.
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