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Response by Adults to Increases in Cigarette Prices by Sociodemographic Characteristics

Author

Listed:
  • Matthew C. Farrelly

    () (Center for Interdisciplinary Substance Abuse Research, Research Triangle Institute)

  • Jeremy W. Bray

    (Center for Interdisciplinary Substance Abuse Research, Research Triangle Institute)

  • Terry Pechacek

    (Center for Interdisciplinary Substance Abuse Research, Research Triangle Institute)

  • Trevor Woollery

    (Center for Interdisciplinary Substance Abuse Research, Research Triangle Institute)

Abstract

Cigarette excise taxes are widely viewed by health economists as an effective tool to reduce cigarette consumption. However, those opposed to increasing cigarette excise taxes often state that the taxes unfairly target certain segments of the population, notably the poor and minorities. Some of this opposition may have been fueled by a lack of understanding of how the tax will affect the health and welfare of various demographic groups of interest. This article provides guidance to policy makers by estimating price elasticities among adults by gender, income, age, and race or ethnicity. Women, adults with income at or below the median income, young adults, African-Americans, and Hispanics are most responsive to cigarette price increases. For example, adults with income at or below the median are more than four times as price-responsive as those with income above the median.

Suggested Citation

  • Matthew C. Farrelly & Jeremy W. Bray & Terry Pechacek & Trevor Woollery, 2001. "Response by Adults to Increases in Cigarette Prices by Sociodemographic Characteristics," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 68(1), pages 156-165, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sej:ancoec:v:68:1:y:2001:p:156-165
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Steven F. Koch & Gauthier Tshiswaka-Kashalala, 2008. "Tobacco Substitution and the Poor," Working Papers 200832, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Nuria Badenes-Plá & Andrew M. Jones, 2003. "Addictive goods and taxes: A survey from an economic perspective," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 167(4), pages 123-153, December.
    3. DeCicca, Philip & McLeod, Logan, 2008. "Cigarette taxes and older adult smoking: Evidence from recent large tax increases," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(4), pages 918-929, July.
    4. Sarah Brown & Mark N. Harris & Jake Prendergast & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Pharmaceutical drug misuse: are industry of employment and occupation risk factors?," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(5-6), pages 398-417, November.
    5. Wehby, George L. & Courtemanche, Charles J., 2012. "The heterogeneity of the cigarette price effect on body mass index," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(5), pages 719-729.
    6. Sarah Brown & Mark N Harris & Jake Prendergast & Preety Srivastava, 2015. "Pharmaceutical Drug Misuse, Industry of Employment and Occupation," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1501, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    7. Gregory J. Colman & Dahlia K. Remler, 2008. "Vertical equity consequences of very high cigarette tax increases: If the poor are the ones smoking, how could cigarette tax increases be progressive?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(2), pages 376-400.
    8. Charles L. Baum & Shin-Yi Chou, 2011. "The Socio-Economic Causes of Obesity," NBER Working Papers 17423, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Peretti-Watel, Patrick & L’haridon, Olivier & Seror, Valerie, 2012. "Responses to increasing cigarette prices in France: How did persistent smokers react?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 106(2), pages 169-176.
    10. Cash, Sean B. & Sunding, David L. & Zilberman, David, 2004. "Fat Taxes And Thin Subsidies: Prices, Diet, And Health Outcomes," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 19961, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    11. Dinno, Alexis & Glantz, Stanton, 2009. "Tobacco control policies are egalitarian: A vulnerabilities perspective on clean indoor air laws, cigarette prices, and tobacco use disparities," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(8), pages 1439-1447, April.
    12. Michael F. Pesko & John A. Tauras & Jidong Huang & Frank J. Chaloupka, IV, 2016. "The Influence of Geography and Measurement in Estimating Cigarette Price Responsiveness," NBER Working Papers 22296, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. New York State Department of Health & (Kevin Davis) & (Matthew Farrelly) & (Qiang Li) & (Andrew Hyland), 2006. "Cigarette Purchasing Patterns among New York Smokers: Implications for Health, Price, and Revenue," University of California at San Francisco, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education qt8026w9n0, Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education, UC San Francisco.
    14. Mark Stehr, 2007. "The effect of cigarette taxes on smoking among men and women," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(12), pages 1333-1343.
    15. Kevin Callison & Robert Kaestner, 2014. "Do Higher Tobacco Taxes Reduce Adult Smoking? New Evidence Of The Effect Of Recent Cigarette Tax Increases On Adult Smoking," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 155-172, January.
    16. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-015-9290-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Michael T. Owyang & E. Katarina Vermann, 2012. "Where there’s a smoking ban, there’s still fire," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue July, pages 265-286.
    18. Johanna Catherine MacLean & Asia Sikora Kessler & Donald S. Kenkel, 2016. "Cigarette Taxes and Older Adult Smoking: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(4), pages 424-438, April.
    19. Montez, Jennifer Karas & Hayward, Mark D. & Wolf, Douglas A., 2017. "Do U.S. states' socioeconomic and policy contexts shape adult disability?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 115-126.
    20. Ramanan Laxminarayan & Anil Deolalikar, 2004. "Tobacco initiation, cessation, and change: evidence from Vietnam," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(12), pages 1191-1201.
    21. Farrelly, Matthew C. & Pechacek, Terry F. & Chaloupka, Frank J., 2003. "The impact of tobacco control program expenditures on aggregate cigarette sales: 1981-2000," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 843-859, September.
    22. Schaap, Maartje M. & Kunst, Anton E. & Leinsalu, Mall & Regidor, Enrique & Espelt, Albert & Ekholm, Ola & Helmert, Uwe & Klumbiene, Jurate & Mackenbach, Johan P., 2009. "Female ever-smoking, education, emancipation and economic development in 19 European countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(7), pages 1271-1278, April.
    23. Matthew C. Farrelly & Terry F. Pechacek & Frank J. Chaloupka, 2001. "The Impact of Tobacco Control Program Expenditures on Aggregate Cigarette Sales: 1981-1998," NBER Working Papers 8691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    24. Charles L. Baum, 2009. "The effects of cigarette costs on BMI and obesity," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(1), pages 3-19.

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