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A Model of Chinese Capital Account Liberalisation

Listed author(s):
  • Dong He

    (Hong Kong Monetary Authority and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

  • Paul Luk

    (Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

Registered author(s):

In shaping the evolution of the global financial system in the decade ahead, few events will likely be more significant than capital account liberalisation in China and the internationalisation of the renminbi. This paper provides a theory-based enquiry into the contours of China's international balance sheets after the renminbi becomes convertible under the capital account. We construct a two-country general equilibrium model with trading in equities and bonds and calibrate the model with US and Chinese data. We interpret Chinese capital account liberalisation as a removal of restrictions that prohibit agents from trading Chinese bonds and US equities. We explore how international risk-sharing can be achieved through portfolio diversification in each of these asset market configurations. We also look at how these holdings would change as China gradually rebalances its production with a higher share of labour income, and as the productivity gap between China and the US narrows. We find that both US and Chinese residents would have incentives to increase their holdings in each other's equities, and to issue debt in each other's currency. We interpret the latter observation as the co-existence of the US dollar and the renminbi as major international currencies.

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Paper provided by Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research in its series Working Papers with number 122013.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2013
Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:122013
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  1. Mark Bils & Peter J. Klenow, 2004. "Some Evidence on the Importance of Sticky Prices," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(5), pages 947-985, October.
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