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China's Monetary Policy Communication: Money Markets not only Listen, They also Understand

Author

Listed:
  • Alicia Garcia-Herrero

    (Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria (BBVA) and Lingnan University and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

  • Eric Girardin

    (Aix-Marseille University and French National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) and ˆ[cole des Hautes ˆ[tudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS) and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

Abstract

Central bank communication is becoming a key aspect of monetary policy as a consequence of financial liberalization and the introduction of market instruments to conduct monetary policy. How much the market listens and, possibly, understands the People's Bank of China (PBoC) should be a key question for the central bank in modernising its monetary policy toolkit. In this paper, we tackle this issue empirically and find that China's money markets not only listen to the PBoC's words but understand the tone of monetary policy which the PBoC intends to convey in its messages. First, we find that the volatility and volume of money market rates change right after communication from the PBoC's governing body. Second, we find a statistically significant rise in interbank rates following communication with a hawkish tone. All in all, our results show strong evidence of effective oral and written communication by the PBoC aimed at China's money markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Alicia Garcia-Herrero & Eric Girardin, 2013. "China's Monetary Policy Communication: Money Markets not only Listen, They also Understand," Working Papers 022013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:022013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cheung, Yin-Wong & Sengupta, Rajeswari, 2011. "Accumulation of reserves and keeping up with the Joneses: The case of LATAM economies," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, pages 19-31.
    2. He, Dong & Wang, Honglin, 2012. "Dual-track interest rates and the conduct of monetary policy in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 928-947.
    3. Eric Girardin & Sandrine Lunven & Guonan Ma, 2017. "China's evolving monetary policy rule: from inflation-accommodating to anti-inflation policy," BIS Working Papers 641, Bank for International Settlements.
    4. Rongrong Sun, 2015. "What Measures Chinese Monetary Policy?," Working Papers 072015, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
    5. Sun, Rongrong, 2015. "What measures Chinese monetary policy?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 263-286.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China Monetary Policy Communication; Money Market;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • E43 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Interest Rates: Determination, Term Structure, and Effects

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