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The Effect of One Extra Year of Schooling on Pisa Results: a Case of Countries with Different Tracking Systems

Author

Listed:
  • Yulia Tyumeneva

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics The International Laboratory for Educational Policy Research)

  • Yulia Kuzmina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics. The International Laboratory for Educational Policy Research;)

Abstract

The purpose of our study is to compare the impact of an extra year of schooling on PISA achievement across several national education systems and explore why that impact may differ across systems. We first attempt to measure and compare the impact of an extra year of schooling on PISA achievement in selected countries. Second, we conduct analyses of possible interaction effects: whether the impact of an extra year of schooling differs for female vs. male students and for students of higher and lower social class. Third, we explore whether splitting students into general vs. vocational tracks changes the effects of an extra year of schooling on achievement. The paper addresses the issue of PISA result interpretation for policy-making: whether countries with low scores also have low school effectiveness and vice versa. Also looking at the specific effects of tracking allows us to consider the academic-vocational problem in a new way

Suggested Citation

  • Yulia Tyumeneva & Yulia Kuzmina, 2012. "The Effect of One Extra Year of Schooling on Pisa Results: a Case of Countries with Different Tracking Systems," HSE Working papers WP BRP 08/EDU/2012, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:08edu2012
    as

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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2012/12/24/1303402083/08EDU2012.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    effect of schooling; Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA); quasi-experimental design; selection in education;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models

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