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The Microeconomics of Violent Conflict

Author

Listed:
  • Philip Verwimp

    () (ECARES, Centre Emile Bernheim and Solvay Brussels School of Economics and Management, UniversiteÌ libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)

  • Patricia Justino

    (Institute of Development Studies, Brighton, UK)

  • Tilman Brück

    (ISDC - International Security and Development Center, Berlin, Germany, and Leibniz Institute of Vegetable and Ornamental Crops, Großbeeren, Germany)

Abstract

In our brief review, we take stock of the emergence, in the last decade, of the “microeconomics of violent conflict†as a new subfield of empirical development economics. We start by de-bunking common misperceptions about the microeconomics of conflict and identify several contributions to economic theory and, in particular, to empirics, methods and data. We also show how the subfield is enriched through cooperation with scholars working in related disciplines. We expect future work to contribute inter alia to the evidence base on peacebuilding interventions, the development of post-conflict institutions, the behavior of firms in conflict areas and the role of emotions in decision-making. We note a disconnect between the rapidly evolving academic subfield on the one hand and the relatively limited use of knowledge thus generated by humanitarian and development organisations and policy makers working in and on conflict-affected areas. We conclude by suggesting that teaching in economics and the discipline-specific JEL codes have not yet kept pace with this recent intellectual development.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Verwimp & Patricia Justino & Tilman Brück, 2018. "The Microeconomics of Violent Conflict," HiCN Working Papers 280, Households in Conflict Network.
  • Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:280
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    File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/HiCN-WP-280.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Osiichuk, Maryna & Shepotylo, Oleksandr, 2020. "Conflict and well-being of civilians: The case of the Russian-Ukrainian hybrid war," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 44(1).
    2. Chiwuzulum Odozi, John & Oyelere, Ruth Uwaifo, 2020. "Violent Conflict Exposure in Nigeria and Labor Supply of Farm Households," GLO Discussion Paper Series 712, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    conflict; violence; war; data; methods JEL Classification: D74; C81; H56; O12;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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