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What methods may be used in impact evaluations of humanitarian assistance?

Listed author(s):
  • Jyotsna Puri

    ()

    (International Initiative for Impact Evaluation (3ie))

  • Anastasia Aladysheva

    (Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI))

  • Vegard Iversen

    (University of Manchester)

  • Yashodhan Ghorpade

    (Institute of Development Studies)

  • Tilman Brück

    (SIPRI, ISDC and HICN)

Despite the widespread occurrence of humanitarian emergencies such as epidemics, earthquakes, droughts, floods and violent conflict and despite the significant financial resources devoted to humanitarian assistance, systematic learning from such interventions using rigorous theory-based impact evaluations are very rare. The objective of this paper is therefore to examine the extent to which scientific impact evaluation methods can provide evidence to help improve the effectiveness and efficiency in humanitarian action. This paper explores the methodological options and challenges associated with collecting and generating high quality evidence needed to answer key questions about the performance of humanitarian assistance, including whether assistance is reaching the right people, at the right time, is bringing about the desired changes in their lives (effectiveness) and is being delivered in the right doses, ways and with manageable costs (efficiency). With the help of six case studies and drawing on real-life examples from the small but growing academic literature, we demonstrate how impact evaluation methods be used successfully and in an ethical manner to learn about how to improve humanitarian assistance. A key lesson from our review is that it pays to be prepared. Much information is being collected these days about the risks of various emergencies unfolding, be they sudden onset or slow onset emergencies. Hence national actors and international donors can prepare for these events and for conducting meaningful impact evaluations. Given the overwhelming needs and the lack of funds, doing more with limited resources is a key challenge for humanitarian assistance and impact evaluation is one way of achieving this.

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File URL: http://www.hicn.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/HiCN-WP-193.pdf
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Paper provided by Households in Conflict Network in its series HiCN Working Papers with number 193.

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Length: 89 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2014
Handle: RePEc:hic:wpaper:193
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.hicn.org

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