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Ownership Structure, Board Composition and Investment Performance

  • Eklund, Johan

    (RATIO and Jönköping International Business School)

  • Palmberg, Johanna


    (Jönköping International Business School)

  • Wiberg, Daniel

    (Jönköping International Business School and CESIS Royal Institute of Technology)

In this paper the relation between ownership structure, board composition and firm performance is explored. A panel of Swedish listed firms is used to investigate how board composition affects firm performance. Board heterogeneity is measured as board size, age and gender diversity. The results show that Swedish board of directors have become more diversified in terms of gender. Also, fewer firms have the CEO on the board which can be interpreted as a sign of increased independency. The regression analysis shows that gender diversity has a small but negative effect on investment performance, and the same holds for CEO being on the board. The analysis also show that board size has a significant negative effect on investment performance. When incorporating all the explanatory variables into one equation however, the negative effect of larger boards dilutes the effect of gender diversity and having the CEO on the board.

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Paper provided by The Ratio Institute in its series Ratio Working Papers with number 129.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 13 Feb 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0129
Contact details of provider: Postal: The Ratio Institute, P.O. Box 5095, SE-102 42 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: 08-441 59 00
Fax: 08-441 59 29
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  1. Jensen, Michael C, 1993. " The Modern Industrial Revolution, Exit, and the Failure of Internal Control Systems," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 48(3), pages 831-80, July.
  2. Villalonga, Belen & Amit, Raphael, 2006. "How do family ownership, control and management affect firm value?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 385-417, May.
  3. Per-Olof Bjuggren & Johan Eklund & Daniel Wiberg, 2007. "Ownership structure, control and firm performance: the effects of vote-differentiated shares," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(16), pages 1323-1334.
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  7. Benjamin E. Hermalin & Michael S. Weisbach, 2003. "Boards of directors as an endogenously determined institution: a survey of the economic literature," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Apr, pages 7-26.
  8. Gugler, Klaus & Mueller, Dennis C & Yurtoglu, B Burcin, 2004. "Corporate Governance and the Returns on Investment," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 47(2), pages 589-633, October.
  9. Fama, Eugene F & Jensen, Michael C, 1983. "Separation of Ownership and Control," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 301-25, June.
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  14. Nina Smith & Valdemar Smith & Mette Verner, 2005. "Do Women in Top Management Affect Firm Performance? A Panel Study of 2500 Danish Firms," CIE Discussion Papers 2005-03, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Industrial Economics.
  15. Nicholas Walt & Coral Ingley, 2003. "Board Dynamics and the Influence of Professional Background, Gender and Ethnic Diversity of Directors," Corporate Governance: An International Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 11(3), pages 218-234, 07.
  16. John, Kose & Senbet, Lemma W., 1998. "Corporate governance and board effectiveness1," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 371-403, May.
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