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Sickness Absence and Local Benefit Cultures

Author

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  • Lindbeck, Assar

    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

  • Palme, Mårten

    (Department of Economics)

  • Persson, Mats

    (Institute for International Economic Studies)

Abstract

In many countries, sickness absence financed by generous insurance benefits is an important concern in the policy debate. There are strong variations in absence behavior among local geographical areas. Such variations are difficult to explain in terms of observable socioeconomic factors. In this paper, we investigate whether such variations are related to group effects in the form of social interaction among individuals within neighborhoods. Well-known methodological problems arise when trying to answer this question. A special feature of our efforts to deal with these problems is that we adopt several alternative approaches to identify group effects. Our study is based on a rich set of Swedish panel data, and we find indications of group effects in each of our approaches.

Suggested Citation

  • Lindbeck, Assar & Palme, Mårten & Persson, Mats, 2014. "Sickness Absence and Local Benefit Cultures," Working Paper Series 1051, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:1051
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    Cited by:

    1. Holmberg, Johan, 2021. "Earnings and Labor Market Dynamics: Indirect Inference Based on Swedish Register Data," Umeå Economic Studies 984, Umeå University, Department of Economics.
    2. Godøy, Anna & Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2018. "Spillovers from gatekeeping – Peer effects in absenteeism," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 167(C), pages 190-204.
    3. Annalisa Scognamiglio, 2020. "Paid Sick Leave and Employee Absences," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 34(3), pages 305-322, September.
    4. Thomas Barnay & Sandrine Juin & Renaud Legal, 2014. "Disparities in taking sick leave between sectors of activity in France: a longitudinal analysis of administrative data," Working Papers halshs-00943327, HAL.
    5. Laszlo Goerke, 2017. "Sick pay reforms and health status in a unionised labour market," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 64(2), pages 115-142, May.
    6. Laszlo Goerke, 2016. "Sick Pay Reforms and Health Status in a Unionised Labour Market," IAAEG Discussion Papers until 2011 201604, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Income insurance; Sic-pay; Social norms; Neighborhood Effects; Sickness Absence;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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