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A multi-sensory tutoring program for students at-risk of reading difficultiesa. Evidence from a randomized field experiment

Author

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  • Bøg, Martin

    (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Dietrichson, Jens

    (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

  • Aldenius Isaksson, Anna

    (IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy)

Abstract

Although reading is a fundamental skill, many students leave school without being proficient readers. We examine a literacy program targeting students most at-risk of reading difficulties in kindergarten and first grade. The program includes multi-sensory learning methods, which focus on phonological awareness and phonics and are delivered in a one-to-one or one-to-two tutoring setting. Using a randomized field experiment with 161 students in 12 Swedish schools, we find large positive effects on our two primary outcomes measures: a standardized test of decoding and a standardized test of letter knowledge. We also find positive effects on measures of phonological awareness and self-efficacy and small and statistically insignificant effects on measures of enjoyment and motivation. The program compares favorably to similar programs in terms of cost-effectiveness.

Suggested Citation

  • Bøg, Martin & Dietrichson, Jens & Aldenius Isaksson, Anna, 2019. "A multi-sensory tutoring program for students at-risk of reading difficultiesa. Evidence from a randomized field experiment," Working Paper Series 2019:7, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:2019_007
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    Cited by:

    1. Andre Nickow & Philip Oreopoulos & Vincent Quan, 2020. "The Impressive Effects of Tutoring on PreK-12 Learning: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of the Experimental Evidence," NBER Working Papers 27476, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    phonological awareness; phonics; tutoring; multi-sensory; kindergarten; first grade; Sweden;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I00 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - General - - - General
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • Z18 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Public Policy

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