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The uneven transition towards universal literacy in Spain, 1860-1930

Author

Listed:
  • Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia

    (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Alfonso Díez-Minguela

    (University of Valencia)

  • Julio Martínez-Galarraga

    (University of Valencia)

  • Daniel A. Tirado

    (University of Valencia)

Abstract

This study provides new evidence on the advance of literacy in Spain during the period 1860-1930. A novel dataset, built with historical information (over 8,000 municipalities) from the Spanish population censuses, enables us to describe this process in detail from the end of the Ancien Régime to the Second Republic. The study thus presents stylized facts at a very low level of geographic aggregation, thereby permitting a closer examination of the main patterns. Overall, spatial differences in literacy were sizeable during the whole nineteenth century. Furthermore, these disparities were only significantly reduced between 1900 and 1930 when the growing demand for these basic skills were met by a stronger government intervention.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martínez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado, 2019. "The uneven transition towards universal literacy in Spain, 1860-1930," Working Papers 0173, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  • Handle: RePEc:hes:wpaper:0173
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    File URL: http://www.ehes.org/EHES_173.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Cinnirella & Alireza Naghavi & Giovanni Prarolo, 2020. "Islam and Human Capital in Historical Spain," CESifo Working Paper Series 8223, CESifo.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Literacy; Regional Disparities; Nineteenth Century; Spain;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • N93 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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