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Two stories, one fate: Age-heaping and literacy in Spain, 1877-1930

Author

Listed:
  • Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia

    (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

  • Alfonso Díez-Minguela

    (Universitat de València)

  • Julio Martinez-Galarraga

    (Universitat de València)

  • Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat

    (Universitat de València)

Abstract

This study looks at human capital in Spain during the early stages of modern economic growth. In order to do so, we have assembled a new dataset on ageheaping and literacy in Spain for both men and women between 1877 and 1930 based on six population censuses with information for 49 provinces. Our results show that age-heaping was less prevalent during the second half of the 19th century than previously thought and did not decrease until the early twentieth century. By contrast, literacy increased throughout the whole period. Interestingly, age-heaping and illiteracy rates depict similar spatial patterns which confirm the stark differences in human capital within Spain. Lastly, we raise critical questions as regards sources, methods, and the interpretation of age-heaping.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco J. Beltrán Tapia & Alfonso Díez-Minguela & Julio Martinez-Galarraga & Daniel A. Tirado-Fabregat, 2018. "Two stories, one fate: Age-heaping and literacy in Spain, 1877-1930," Working Papers 0139, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  • Handle: RePEc:hes:wpaper:0139
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    File URL: http://www.ehes.org/EHES_139.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spain; age-heaping; literacy; nineteenth-century;

    JEL classification:

    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development
    • N9 - Economic History - - Regional and Urban History
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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