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Youth ! ... How did you find your job ?

Author

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  • Fathi Fakhfakh

    () (UP2 - Université Panthéon-Assas, TEPP - Travail, Emploi et Politiques Publiques - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UPEM - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée)

  • Annick Vignes

    () (CAMS - Centre d'analyse et de mathématique sociale - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, ENPC - École des Ponts ParisTech)

  • Jihan Ghrairi

    () (TEPP - Travail, Emploi et Politiques Publiques - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique - UPEM - Université Paris-Est Marne-la-Vallée, UP2 - Université Panthéon-Assas)

Abstract

French youth suffer from a high level of unemployment. Despite a large number of public policies, youth employability remains at a critical level. This article emphasizes the role of networks in getting a job, while distinguishing between school networks and social/professional networks, and this a novelty of this study. We postulate that workers use networks differently depending mainly on their individual and their socio-spatial characteristics. The empirical analysis shows that more than 30% of young people find a job thanks to their social or school network. School networks help better-educated people, whereas social networks are more fruitful for the less well-educated. Being a woman or having non-French parents reduce the probability of finding a job through social or school networks. Finally, people living in sensitive urban areas are more affected by unemployment, and they are more likely to find a job through school networks, public agencies or competitive exams. Thus, networks help in finding a job, but to different extents depending on education, origin, gender or place of residence.

Suggested Citation

  • Fathi Fakhfakh & Annick Vignes & Jihan Ghrairi, 2015. "Youth ! ... How did you find your job ?," Working Papers hal-01253907, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:hal-01253907
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-01253907
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    youth labor market; job access channels; Social and professional networks; school networks; socio-spatial indicators;

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