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The Importance of Networks in the Market for University Graduates in Japan: A Longitudinal Analysis of Hiring Patterns

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  • Rebick, Marcus E

Abstract

This study examines the extent to which the transition from university education to work is characterised by persistent hiring flows between university faculties and employers, rather than being characterised by an open market process. More than half of all hires may be attributed to persistence in hiring by employers from specific faculties. Persistence appears to be related to the screening of potential employees and to the assurance of supply. Persistence is also stronger in hiring from faculties with higher percentages of male graduates, supporting the view that investment in employment ties rises with the expected tenure of the hired employee. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Rebick, Marcus E, 2000. "The Importance of Networks in the Market for University Graduates in Japan: A Longitudinal Analysis of Hiring Patterns," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 52(3), pages 471-496, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:52:y:2000:i:3:p:471-96
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    Cited by:

    1. Manuel F. Bagues & Mauro Sylos Labini, 2009. "Do Online Labor Market Intermediaries Matter? The Impact of AlmaLaurea on the University-to-Work Transition," NBER Chapters,in: Studies of Labor Market Intermediation, pages 127-154 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Daiji Kawaguchi & Hiroshi Ono, "undated". "Educational Credentialism and Elite Formation in Japan: A Long-term Perspective," Working Papers e54, Tokyo Center for Economic Research.
    3. David Margolis & Véronique Simonnet, 2002. "Educational Track, Networks and Labor Market Outcomes," Working Papers 2002-60, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    4. John Knight & Linda Yueh, 2008. "The role of social capital in the labour market in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 16(3), pages 389-414, July.
    5. Claire Bonnard, 2012. "The Access of the Young Graduates in Sciences into R&D Profession: A Switching Model Treatment for the French Case," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 26(1), pages 46-65, March.
    6. Fathi Fakhfakh & Annick Vignes & Jihan Ghrairi, 2015. "Youth ! ... How did you find your job ?," Working Papers hal-01253907, HAL.
    7. Yamamura, Eiji, 2008. "The role of social capital in homogeneous society: Review of recent researches in Japan," MPRA Paper 11385, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Dargnies, Marie-Pierre, 2011. "Social identity and competitiveness," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Market Behavior SP II 2011-202, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    9. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Ma, Wenjie, 2008. "The causal effect of graduating from a top university on promotion: Evidence from the University of Tokyo's 1969 admission freeze," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 184-196, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations

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