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The role of U.S., China, Brazil's agricultural and trade policies on global food supply and demand

Author

Listed:
  • Simla Tokgoz
  • Danielle Alencar Parente Torres
  • David Laborde
  • Jikun Huang

Abstract

Brazil, China and U.S. play crucial roles in global food supply and demand system as consumers, producers, and traders. Therefore, any agricultural and environmental policy tool of these 3 countries deserve special attention since their policy environment contributes to farmers' decisions to plant and consumers' decisions to buy. In an era of growing demand pressures, it is more important than ever before to understand the impact of policies relevant to land and water resources. This study attempts to identify and analyze these dynamics for these 3 countries in a global context.

Suggested Citation

  • Simla Tokgoz & Danielle Alencar Parente Torres & David Laborde & Jikun Huang, 2014. "The role of U.S., China, Brazil's agricultural and trade policies on global food supply and demand," FOODSECURE Working papers 19, LEI Wageningen UR.
  • Handle: RePEc:fsc:fspubl:19
    as

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    File URL: http://www3.lei.wur.nl/FoodSecurePublications/19_Tokgoz_et-al_US-China-Brasil-trade-policies.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2010. "Agricultural Development, Nutrition, and the Policies Behind China’s Success," Asian Journal of Agriculture and Development, Southeast Asian Regional Center for Graduate Study and Research in Agriculture (SEARCA), vol. 7(1), pages 1-34, June.
    2. Huang, Qiuqiong & Rozelle, Scott & Howitt, Richard E. & Wang, Jinxia & Huang, Jikun, 2006. "Irrigation Water Pricing Policy in China," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21241, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
    3. Osteen, Craig D. & Vasavada, Utpal, 2012. "Agricultural Resources and Environmental Indicators, 2012 Edition," Economic Information Bulletin 132048, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    4. Jian Xie, 2009. "Addressing China's Water Scarcity : Recommendations for Selected Water Resource Management Issues," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2585, December.
    5. Lilian Elabras Veiga & Alessandra Magrini, 2013. "The Brazilian Water Resources Management Policy: Fifteen Years of Success and Challenges," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 27(7), pages 2287-2302, May.
    6. Xiwen Chen, 2009. "Review of China's agricultural and rural development: policy changes and current issues," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(2), pages 121-135, January.
    7. Lohmar, Bryan & Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Tuan, Francis C. & Hansen, James M., 2009. "China's Ongoing Agricultural Modernization: Challenges Remain After 30 Years of Reform," Economic Information Bulletin 58316, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    8. Xiangzheng Deng & Jikun Huang & Scott Rozelle & Emi Uchida, 2010. "Economic Growth and the Expansion of Urban Land in China," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 47(4), pages 813-843, April.
    9. Qu, Futian & Kuyvenhoven, Arie & Shi, Xiaoping & Heerink, Nico, 2011. "Sustainable natural resource use in rural China: Recent trends and policies," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 444-460.
    10. Colin A. Carter & Funing Zhong & Jing Zhu, 2012. "Advances in Chinese Agriculture and its Global Implications," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 1-36.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F1 - International Economics - - Trade
    • F4 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance
    • F5 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy
    • Q18 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Agricultural Policy; Food Policy

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