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Advances in Chinese Agriculture and its Global Implications

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  • Colin A. Carter
  • Funing Zhong
  • Jing Zhu

Abstract

In the past thirty years, China has made great strides in terms of boosting food production while simultaneously reducing the number of its rural poor. This success was largely accomplished through agricultural policy and trade reform, food market liberalization, and public investment in agricultural infrastructure and agricultural research. However, there is much more economic development work to be done in rural China, as issues such as an aging agricultural workforce, land-use rights, and water shortages persist. At the same time, increased urbanization and the rising middle class are changing the demand for food in China. This article outlines the issues facing Chinese agriculture and connects those issues to the global marketplace. Copyright 2012, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Colin A. Carter & Funing Zhong & Jing Zhu, 2012. "Advances in Chinese Agriculture and its Global Implications," Applied Economic Perspectives and Policy, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 34(1), pages 1-36.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:apecpp:v:34:y:2012:i:1:p:1-36
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/aepp/ppr047
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    Cited by:

    1. Brink, Lars & Orden, David, 2017. "The United States WTO Complaint on China’s Agricultural Domestic Support: Preliminary Observations (Paper)," Proceedings Issues, 2016: Climate Change and International Agricultural Trade in the Aftermath of COP21, December 11-13, 2016, Scottsdale, Arizona 253002, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    2. Komarek, Adam M., 2013. "Costs and benefits of crop residue retention in a Chinese subsistence farming system," 2013 Conference (57th), February 5-8, 2013, Sydney, Australia 152197, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    3. Simla Tokgoz & Danielle Alencar Parente Torres & David Laborde & Jikun Huang, 2014. "The role of U.S., China, Brazil's agricultural and trade policies on global food supply and demand," FOODSECURE Working papers 19, LEI Wageningen UR.
    4. Ito, Junichi & Ni, Jing, 2013. "Capital deepening, land use policy, and self-sufficiency in China's grain sector," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 95-107.
    5. Tianxiang Li & Tomas Baležentis & Lijuan Cao & Jing Zhu & Irena Kriščiukaitienė & Rasa Melnikienė, 2016. "Are the Changes in China’s Grain Production Sustainable: Extensive and Intensive Development by the LMDI Approach," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(12), pages 1-24, November.
    6. Yu, Xiaohua & Abler, David, 2016. "Matching food with mouths: A statistical explanation to the abnormal decline of per capita food consumption in rural China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 36-43.
    7. Jianmei Zhao & Peter J. Barry, 2014. "Income Diversification of Rural Households in China," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 62(3), pages 307-324, September.

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