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Addressing China's Water Scarcity : Recommendations for Selected Water Resource Management Issues

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  • Jian Xie

Abstract

This report reviews China's water scarcity situation, assesses the policy and institutional requirements for addressing it, and recommends key areas for strengthening and reform. It is a synthesis of the main findings and recommendations from analytical work and case studies prepared under the World Bank Analytical and Advisory Assistance (AAA) program entitled 'Addressing China's Water Scarcity: from Analysis to Action.' These studies focus on several strategically important thematic areas for China where additional research was needed, as identified by the research team and advisory group based on a review of pressing issues. These areas are governance, water rights, pricing, ecological compensation, pollution control, and emergency response. The approach has been to evaluate Chinese and international experience to identify policy and institutional factors that have proven effective in promoting the adoption of water conservation and pollution reduction technologies. The research was based on literature reviews, qualitative and quantitative policy analyses, household surveys, field trips, and case studies to develop feasible recommendations for a plan of action based on realities on the ground.

Suggested Citation

  • Jian Xie, 2009. "Addressing China's Water Scarcity : Recommendations for Selected Water Resource Management Issues," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2585.
  • Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:2585
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Wang, Jinxia & Xu, Zhigang & Huang, Jikun & Rozelle, Scott, 2005. "Incentives in water management reform: assessing the effect on water use, production, and poverty in the Yellow River Basin," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 10(6), pages 769-799, December.
    3. Shalizi, Zmarak, 2006. "Addressing China's growing water shortages and associated social and environmental consequences," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3895, The World Bank.
    4. Yang, Hong & Zhang, Xiaohe & Zehnder, Alexander J. B., 2003. "Water scarcity, pricing mechanism and institutional reform in northern China irrigated agriculture," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 143-161, June.
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    6. Huang, Qiuqiong & Rozelle, Scott & Howitt, Richard E. & Wang, Jinxia & Huang, Jikun, 2006. "Irrigation Water Pricing Policy in China," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21241, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
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    Cited by:

    1. Simla Tokgoz & Danielle Alencar Parente Torres & David Laborde & Jikun Huang, 2014. "The role of U.S., China, Brazil's agricultural and trade policies on global food supply and demand," FOODSECURE Working papers 19, LEI Wageningen UR.
    2. Ivan Roberts & Trent Saunders & Gareth Spence & Natasha Cassidy, 2016. "China's Evolving Demand for Commodities," RBA Annual Conference Volume (Discontinued), in: Iris Day & John Simon (ed.), Structural Change in China: Implications for Australia and the World, Reserve Bank of Australia.
    3. Eisenbarth, Sabrina, 2017. "Is Chinese trade policy motivated by environmental concerns?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 74-103.
    4. David Coleman, 2009. "Divergent Patterns in the Ethnic Transformation of Societies," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 35(3), pages 449-478, September.
    5. Michael Webber & Britt Crow-Miller & Sarah Rogers, 2017. "The South–North Water Transfer Project: remaking the geography of China," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(3), pages 370-382, March.
    6. Chun Xia & Claudia Pahl-Wostl, 2012. "The Development of Water Allocation Management in The Yellow River Basin," Water Resources Management: An International Journal, Published for the European Water Resources Association (EWRA), Springer;European Water Resources Association (EWRA), vol. 26(12), pages 3395-3414, September.
    7. Asian Development Bank Institute, 2017. "Toward a National Eco-Compensation Regulation in the People’s Republic of China," Working Papers id:11734, eSocialSciences.
    8. Qu, Futian & Kuyvenhoven, Arie & Shi, Xiaoping & Heerink, Nico, 2011. "Sustainable natural resource use in rural China: Recent trends and policies," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 444-460.
    9. Alla Fridman, 2015. "Water pricing reform analysis: alternative scenarios," Journal of Economic Policy Reform, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(3), pages 258-266, September.

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