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China's Ongoing Agricultural Modernization: Challenges Remain After 30 Years of Reform

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  • Lohmar, Bryan
  • Gale, H. Frederick, Jr.
  • Tuan, Francis C.
  • Hansen, James M.

Abstract

Thirty years ago, China began implementing a series of reforms to improve efficiency in agricultural production. These, and subsequent, reforms reshaped China’s position in the world economy. China’s rapid economic development and transformation from a planned to a market-oriented economy, however, has reached a stage where further efficiency gains in agricultural production will likely hinge on the development of modern market-supporting institutions. The development of market-supporting institutions in China will bring about long-term and sustainable benefits to producers and consumers in China and the global agricultural economy. This report provides an overview of current issues in China’s agricultural development, policy responses to these issues, and the effects of these policies on China’s growing role in international markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Lohmar, Bryan & Gale, H. Frederick, Jr. & Tuan, Francis C. & Hansen, James M., 2009. "China's Ongoing Agricultural Modernization: Challenges Remain After 30 Years of Reform," Economic Information Bulletin 58316, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:uersib:58316
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58316
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:scient:v:90:y:2012:i:1:d:10.1007_s11192-011-0517-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Jim Hansen & Francis Tuan & Linxiu Zhang & Agapi Somwaru, 2011. "Do China's agricultural policies matter for world commodity markets?," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(1), pages 6-25, January.
    3. Simla Tokgoz & Danielle Alencar Parente Torres & David Laborde & Jikun Huang, 2014. "The role of U.S., China, Brazil's agricultural and trade policies on global food supply and demand," FOODSECURE Working papers 19, LEI Wageningen UR.
    4. Costa, Caio Cesar de Medeiros & Reis, Paulo Ricardo da Costa & Ferreira, Marco Aurelio Marques, 2012. "Impacts And Externalities Of Agricultural Modernization In Brazilian States," APSTRACT: Applied Studies in Agribusiness and Commerce, AGRIMBA, vol. 6.
    5. Qingbin Wang & Robert Parsons & Guangxuan Zhang, 2010. "China's dairy markets: trends, disparities, and implications for trade," China Agricultural Economic Review, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 2(3), pages 356-371, September.
    6. Roberto Fanfani & Nica Claudia Calò, 2011. "Rural Areas and Agricultural Holdings in China: What Has Changed Within Ten Years from the 1996 to the 2006?," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
    7. Daniel Poon, 2014. "China’s Development Trajectory: A Strategic Opening for Industrial Policy in the South," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 218, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    8. Gale, Fred, 2013. "Growth and Evolution in China's Agricultural Support Policies," Economic Research Report 155385, United States Department of Agriculture, Economic Research Service.
    9. Heerman, Kari E.R. & Arita, Shawn & Gopinath, Munisamy, 2015. "Asia-Pacific Integration with China vs. the United States: Examining trade patterns under heterogeneous agricultural sectors," 2015 Allied Social Science Association (ASSA) Annual Meeting, January 3-5, 2015, Boston, Massachusetts 189819, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    China; economic reform; economic development; agricultural production; agricultural trade; Agricultural and Food Policy; International Relations/Trade; Production Economics;

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