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Mismeasurement of Distance Effects: The Role of Internal Location of Production

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  • Hakan Yilmazkuday

    () (Department of Economics, Florida International University)

Abstract

The estimated effects of distance in empirical international trade regressions are unrealistically high. Using state-and-sector level U.S. exports data, this paper shows analytically and proves empirically that ignoring the internal location of production (of international exports), which leads to the overestimation of distance e¡èects by about twofold, is a possible explanation. This overestimation is mostly attributed to the mismeasurement of the distance elasticity of trade costs when internal locations of production are ignored. A corrective distance index is proposed to avoid such mismeasurements and is shown to work well for the median sector. The results are robust to the consideration of alternative estimation methodologies and data sets.

Suggested Citation

  • Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2014. "Mismeasurement of Distance Effects: The Role of Internal Location of Production," Working Papers 1412, Florida International University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:fiu:wpaper:1412
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gabriel J Felbermayr & Wilhelm Kohler, 2014. "Exploring the Intensive and Extensive Margins of World Trade," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: European Economic Integration, WTO Membership, Immigration and Offshoring, chapter 4, pages 115-148 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
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    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Mismeasurement of Distance Effects: The Role of Internal Location of Production
      by Hakan Yilmazkuday in Hakan Yilmazkuday's Blog on 2016-12-08 21:27:00

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    1. repec:bla:reviec:v:25:y:2017:i:3:p:649-676 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Hakan Yilmazkuday, 2017. "A Solution to the Missing Globalization Puzzle by Non-CES Preferences," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(3), pages 649-676, August.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Corrective Distance Index; Elasticity of Substitution; Distance Elasticity of Trade; State Exports;

    JEL classification:

    • F12 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Models of Trade with Imperfect Competition and Scale Economies; Fragmentation
    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade

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