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Is Islamic Banking Good for Growth?

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick IMAM

    (FERDI)

  • Roland Kangni KPODAR

    (International Monetary Fund (IMF))

Abstract

The rapid growth of Islamic banking has attracted much attention lately in the economic literature. At the same time, a mature body of the literature has shown that financial development is broadly conducive to economic growth, which raises the question as to whether a similar conclusion holds for Islamic banking. Against this backdrop, this paper investigates the relationship between Islamic banking development and economic growth in a sample of low and middle income countries, using data over the period 1990-2010. The results show that, notwithstanding its relatively small size compared to the economy and the overall size of the financial system, Islamic banking is positively associated with economic growth even after controlling for various determinants, including the level of financial depth. The results are robust across across different specifications, sample composition and time periods.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick IMAM & Roland Kangni KPODAR, 2015. "Is Islamic Banking Good for Growth?," Working Papers P124, FERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:fdi:wpaper:2078
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Sami Ben Naceur & Adolfo Barajas & Alexander Massara, 2017. "Can Islamic banking increase financial inclusion?," Chapters,in: Handbook of Empirical Research on Islam and Economic Life, chapter 9, pages 213-252 Edward Elgar Publishing.
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    4. Patrick Imam & Kangni Kpodar, 2013. "Islamic Banking: How Has It Expanded?," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(6), pages 112-137, November.
    5. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084 Central Bank of Chile.
    6. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Finn Tarp, 2003. "Financial liberalization, financial development and economic growth in LDCs," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(2), pages 189-209.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Florian Léon & Laurent Weill, 2016. "Islamic Banking Development and Access to Credit," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2016-02, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg.
    2. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Phan, Dinh Hoang Bach & Narayan, Seema & Bannigidadmath, Deepa, 2017. "Is there a financial news risk premium in Islamic stocks?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 158-170.
    3. repec:eee:riibaf:v:41:y:2017:i:c:p:136-147 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mohamad Husam Helmi, 2016. "Islamic Banking, Credit and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1541, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. repec:eee:pacfin:v:48:y:2018:i:c:p:99-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Kumru, Cagri S. & Sarntisart, Saran, 2016. "Banking for those unwilling to bank: Implications of Islamic banking systems," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-12.
    7. Aysan, Ahmet F. & Disli, Mustafa & Ng, Adam & Ozturk, Huseyin, 2016. "Is small the new big? Islamic banking for SMEs in Turkey," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 187-194.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G0 - Financial Economics - - General
    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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