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Banking for those unwilling to bank: Implications of Islamic banking systems

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  • Kumru, Cagri S.
  • Sarntisart, Saran

Abstract

A significant number of Muslims are unwilling to deposit their savings into the conventional banking sector since it does not operate according to their religious beliefs. In this paper we provide a model that aims to explore growth and welfare implications of an Islamic banking system that operates according to Muslims' religious principles. Our model shows that in an economy populated with a certain number of religiously concerned individuals, the existence of an Islamic banking system can generate higher growth and improve welfare substantially. These theoretical results are in line with recent empirical findings.

Suggested Citation

  • Kumru, Cagri S. & Sarntisart, Saran, 2016. "Banking for those unwilling to bank: Implications of Islamic banking systems," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecmode:v:54:y:2016:i:c:p:1-12
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econmod.2015.12.011
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    Cited by:

    1. Ahmet Faruk Faysan & Mustafa Disli, 2019. "Small Business Lending And Credit Risk: Granger Causality Evidence," Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium 19/963, Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration.
    2. repec:eee:intfin:v:50:y:2017:i:c:p:135-155 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Ahmet F. Aysan & Mustafa Disli & Huseyin Ozturk, 2018. "Bank lending channel in a dual banking system: Why are Islamic banks so responsive?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 674-698, March.
    4. Meslier, Céline & Risfandy, Tastaftiyan & Tarazi, Amine, 2017. "Dual market competition and deposit rate setting in Islamic and conventional banks," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 318-333.
    5. Imam, Patrick & Kpodar, Kangni, 2016. "Islamic banking: Good for growth?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 387-401.
    6. Wanke, Peter & Azad, Md. Abul Kalam & Barros, Carlos Pestana & Hassan, M. Kabir, 2016. "Predicting efficiency in Islamic banks: An integrated multicriteria decision making (MCDM) approach," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 126-141.
    7. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Phan, Dinh Hoang Bach & Narayan, Seema & Bannigidadmath, Deepa, 2017. "Is there a financial news risk premium in Islamic stocks?," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 158-170.
    8. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Phan, Dinh Hoang Bach, 2017. "Momentum strategies for Islamic stocks," Pacific-Basin Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 96-112.
    9. repec:eee:finsta:v:36:y:2018:i:c:p:22-38 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:pacfin:v:53:y:2019:i:c:p:484-496 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Islamic banking; Growth; Welfare;

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