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Multiple Standards: the Case of the French Building Industry

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  • Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline

    () (Paris School of Economics, University of Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne and INRA UMR Economie Publique,)

Abstract

The building sector is simultaneously characterized by regulation pervasiveness, by the superposition and overlapping of technical standards, and by a profusion of labels. This paper analyzes the rationale for such a multiplicity of mandatory and voluntary standards. The main consequences are the risk of confusion in the minds of buyers and the rise in prices due to the additional costs imposed by the continuous progression of requirements and the need to comply with many different standards. Both effects seriously hamper the penetration of the market by the products with the most demanding labels. The simplification of this regulatory and normative package would likely improve the economic efficiency of the sector.

Suggested Citation

  • Mireille Chiroleu-Assouline, 2016. "Multiple Standards: the Case of the French Building Industry," Policy Papers 2016.08, FAERE - French Association of Environmental and Resource Economists.
  • Handle: RePEc:fae:ppaper:2016.08
    as

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    File URL: http://faere.fr/pub/PolicyPapers/Chiroleu-Assouline_FAERE_PP2016.08.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2016
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    NGOs; Energy efficiency; CSR; Labels; Voluntary self-regulation; Building industry;

    JEL classification:

    • L31 - Industrial Organization - - Nonprofit Organizations and Public Enterprise - - - Nonprofit Institutions; NGOs; Social Entrepreneurship
    • L74 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Primary Products and Construction - - - Construction
    • L15 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Information and Product Quality
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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