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Competing eco-labels and product market competition

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  • Li, Yi

Abstract

I analyze a green product market in which eco-labeling programs compete—programs certifying the environmental quality of the product to their respective standards. Specifically, I examine the strategic competition between an industry-sponsored program and a program sponsored by nongovernmental organization (NGO) in a duopoly product market where eco-labels are strategic variables for firms. In particular, I analyze the effects of such eco-label competition on environmental benefit and social welfare. I show that the eco-label competition may generate the same environmental benefit and generally increase social welfare relative to a single NGO label.

Suggested Citation

  • Li, Yi, 2016. "Competing eco-labels and product market competition," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, Boston, Massachusetts 235389, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:aaea16:235389
    DOI: 10.22004/ag.econ.235389
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    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/record/235389/files/Yi%20Li%202016%20AAEA%20.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ben Youssef Adel & Abderrazak Chema, 2009. "Multiplicity of Eco-Labels, Competition, and the Environment," Journal of Agricultural & Food Industrial Organization, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-24, December.
    2. Crampes, Claude & Hollander, Abraham, 1995. "Duopoly and quality standards," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 71-82, January.
    3. Olivier Bonroy & Christos Constantatos, 2015. "On the Economics of Labels: How Their Introduction Affects the Functioning of Markets and the Welfare of All Participants," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 97(1), pages 239-259.
    4. Amacher, Gregory S. & Koskela, Erkki & Ollikainen, Markku, 2004. "Environmental quality competition and eco-labeling," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 284-306, March.
    5. Carolyn Fischer & Thomas P. Lyon, 2014. "Competing Environmental Labels," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 692-716, September.
    6. Julie A. Caswell & Eliza M. Mojduszka, 1996. "Using Informational Labeling to Influence the Market for Quality in Food Products," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(5), pages 1248-1253.
    7. Lucie Bottega & Jenny De Freitas, 2009. "Public, Private and Nonprofit Regulation for Environmental Quality," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 18(1), pages 105-123, March.
    8. Adel Ben Youssef & Rim Lahmandi-Ayed, 2008. "Eco-labelling, Competition and Environment: Endogenization of Labelling Criteria," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 41(2), pages 133-154, October.
    9. Mussa, Michael & Rosen, Sherwin, 1978. "Monopoly and product quality," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 18(2), pages 301-317, August.
    10. Li, Yuanhao & van 't Veld, Klaas, 2015. "Green, greener, greenest: Eco-label gradation and competition," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 164-176.
    11. Lisette Ibanez & Gilles Grolleau, 2008. "Can Ecolabeling Schemes Preserve the Environment?," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 40(2), pages 233-249, June.
    12. Brian Roe & Ian Sheldon, 2007. "Credence Good Labeling: The Efficiency and Distributional Implications of Several Policy Approaches," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 89(4), pages 1020-1033.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eliaz, Kfir & Oren-Kolbinger, Orli & Weisburd, Sarit, 2017. "Limited Attention, Salience and Changing Prices: Evidence from a Field Experiment in Online Supermarket Shopping," CEPR Discussion Papers 12014, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

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    Keywords

    Agricultural and Food Policy; Environmental Economics and Policy; Industrial Organization; Public Economics;

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