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Media Coverage and Immigration Worries: Econometric Evidence

Author

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  • Christine Benesch
  • Simon Loretz
  • David Stadelmann
  • Tobias Thomas

Abstract

This paper empirically explores the link between mass media coverage of migration and immigration worries. Using detailed data on media coverage in Germany, we show that the amount of media reports regarding migration issues is positively associated with concerns about immigration among the German population. The association is robust to the inclusion of time-variant individual control variables and individual fixed-effects. We employ media spillovers from the neighboring country of Switzerland, which occur due to referendum decisions on immigration as an instrumental variable to address endogeneity concerns. The IV estimates suggest that media coverage has a causal impact on immigration worries. Exploring heterogeneous effects between respondents, the results reveal that the link between media reports and immigration worries is particularly relevant for women and respondents active in the workforce.

Suggested Citation

  • Christine Benesch & Simon Loretz & David Stadelmann & Tobias Thomas, 2018. "Media Coverage and Immigration Worries: Econometric Evidence," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 970, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwsop:diw_sp970
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    Cited by:

    1. Fišar, Miloš & Reggiani, Tommaso G. & Sabatini, Fabio & Špalek, Jiří, 2020. "Media Bias and Tax Compliance: Experimental Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 12938, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Gerling, Lena & Kellermann, Kim Leonie, 2019. "The impact of election information shocks on populist party preferences: Evidence from Germany," CIW Discussion Papers 3/2019, University of Münster, Center for Interdisciplinary Economics (CIW).
    3. Dewenter, Ralf & Linder, Melissa & Thomas, Tobias, 2019. "Can media drive the electorate? The impact of media coverage on voting intentions," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 58(C), pages 245-261.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    media; migration; news spillovers; political attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • L8 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making
    • F2 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business

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