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Persuasion: Empirical Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Stefano DellaVigna
  • Matthew Gentzkow

    (Department of Economics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, and NBER
    Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, and NBER)

Abstract

We provide a selective survey of empirical evidence on the effects as well as the drivers of persuasive communication. We consider persuasion directed at consumers, voters, donors, and investors. We organize our review around four questions. First, to what extent does persuasion affect the behavior of each of these groups? Second, what models best capture the response to persuasive communication? Third, what are persuaders' incentives, and what limits their ability to distort communications? Finally, what evidence exists on the way persuasion affects equilibrium outcomes in economics and politics?

Suggested Citation

  • Stefano DellaVigna & Matthew Gentzkow, 2010. "Persuasion: Empirical Evidence," Annual Review of Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 2(1), pages 643-669, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:anr:reveco:v:2:y:2010:p:643-669
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    File URL: http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev.economics.102308.124309
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    communication; beliefs;

    JEL classification:

    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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