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How Many Bucks in a Bang: On the Estimation of the Economic Costs of Conflict

  • Olaf J. de Groot
  • Tilman Brück
  • Carlos Bozzoli

The estimation of the costs of conflict is currently receiving a lot of attention in the literature. This paper aims to give a thorough overview of the existing literature, first by addressing the history of case studies that address conflict costs and second by looking at the existing body of cross-country analyses for conflict costs. In addition to the existing cross-country literature, a number of studies that only concern themselves with particular elements of conflict costs are included as well. In the end, this paper combines the insights from these previous analyses to explore how much room there is to further improve the existing studies. Specific recommendations are given how to proceed with the development of the field of conflict cost measurement.

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Paper provided by DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research in its series Economics of Security Working Paper Series with number 21.

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Length: 35 p.
Date of creation: 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:diw:diweos:diweos21
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  1. Alberto Abadie & Javier Gardeazabal, 2003. "The Economic Costs of Conflict: A Case Study of the Basque Country," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 113-132, March.
  2. Reitschuler, Gerhard & Loening, Josef L., 2005. "Modeling the Defense-Growth Nexus in Guatemala," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 513-526, March.
  3. Grobar, Lisa Morris & Gnanaselvam, Shiranthi, 1993. "The Economic Effects of the Sri Lankan Civil War," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 41(2), pages 395-405, January.
  4. Paul Dunne & Sam Perlo-Freeman, 2003. "The Demand for Military Spending in Developing Countries," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 23-48.
  5. Christopher Blattman & Jeannie Annan, 2010. "The Consequences of Child Soldiering," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 92(4), pages 882-898, November.
  6. David Roodman, 2007. "A Note on the Theme of Too Many Instruments," Working Papers 125, Center for Global Development.
  7. William D. Nordhaus, 2002. "The Economic Consequences of a War with Iraq," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1387, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  8. Arunatilake, Nisha & Jayasuriya, Sisira & Kelegama, Saman, 2001. "The Economic Cost of the War in Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(9), pages 1483-1500, September.
  9. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1990. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 3541, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Richard Blundell & Steve Bond & Frank Windmeijer, 2000. "Estimation in dynamic panel data models: improving on the performance of the standard GMM estimator," IFS Working Papers W00/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  11. Maria Arrazola & Jose de Hevia, 2006. "Gender Differentials in Returns to Education in Spain," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 469-486.
  12. Olaf De Groot, 2010. "The Spillover Effects Of Conflict On Economic Growth In Neighbouring Countries In Africa," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 149-164.
  13. Sabrina DiAddario, 1997. "Estimating the economic costs of conflict: An examination of the two-gap estimation model for the case of Nicaragua," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 123-141.
  14. Humberto Lopez & Quentin Wodon, 2005. "The Economic Impact of Armed Conflict in Rwanda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(4), pages 586-602, December.
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