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The Economic Cost of the War in Sri Lanka

Author

Listed:
  • Nisha Arunatilake

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

  • Sisira Kumara Jayasuriya

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

  • Saman Kelegama

    (School of Economics, La Trobe University)

Abstract

There is growing interest in recent years in the economic dimensions of civil wars and other violent social conflicts. This paper discusses some of the conceptual and methodological problems associated with assessing the economic costs of such conflicts, and presents an evaluation of the costs of the (still ongoing) conflict in Sri Lanka. On conservative assumptions, the war may have cost the equivalent of twice Sri Lanka's 1996 GDP.

Suggested Citation

  • Nisha Arunatilake & Sisira Kumara Jayasuriya & Saman Kelegama, 1999. "The Economic Cost of the War in Sri Lanka," Working Papers 1999.10, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:trb:wpaper:1999.10
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    1. Malcolm Knight & Norman Loayza & Delano Villanueva, 1996. "The Peace Dividend: Military Spending Cuts and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 43(1), pages 1-37, March.
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    3. Meghan O'Sullivan, 1997. "Household entitlements during wartime: The experience of Sri Lanka," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 95-121.
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    Keywords

    War; Economic History; Costs;
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