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Analyzing the costs of military engagement

Author

Listed:
  • Olaf J. de Groot

    () (DIW, Berlin)

Abstract

Analyzing governments’ expenditure when it comes to military engagement is a challenging task. As governments are neither transparent nor eager to come forward with the necessary information, researchers make a lot of assumptions that require extensive justification. This article details a range of relevant cost channels and describes the difficulties in estimating their respective sizes. But when worked-up in a careful and deliberate way, it is possible to obtain reasonable estimates of the budgetary effects of military engagements. Following the outlined methodology creates an opportunity to improve openness, which will benefit researchers, policymakers, and the public at large.

Suggested Citation

  • Olaf J. de Groot, 2012. "Analyzing the costs of military engagement," Economics of Peace and Security Journal, EPS Publishing, vol. 7(2), pages 41-49, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:epc:journl:v:7:y:2012:i:2:p:41-49
    as

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    File URL: http://www.epsjournal.org.uk/index.php/EPSJ/article/view/142
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conflict; costs; military engagement;

    JEL classification:

    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • H56 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - National Security and War

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