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Who Wants to Revise Privatization and Why? Evidence from 28 Post-Communist Countries

  • Denisova, Irina
  • Eller, Markus
  • Frye, Timothy
  • Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina

A 2006 survey of 28,000 individuals in 28 post-communist countries reveals overwhelming support for revising privatization, but most respondents prefer to leave firms in private hands. We examine who wants to revise privatization and why. Respondents with poor human capital and few assets support revising privatization due to a preference for state over private property. Economic hardships during transition increase support for revising privatization due to the perceived unfairness of privatization. The institutional environment has no impact on how human capital and asset ownership influence attitudes toward privatization, but does affect how economic hardships during transition shape these attitudes.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 6603.

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Date of creation: Dec 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:6603
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  29. Megginson, William Leon, 2005. "The Financial Economics of Privatization," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195150629, July.
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