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Who Wants To Revise Privatization? The Complementarity of Market Skills and Institutions

Author

Listed:
  • Irina Denisova

    (Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR), Moscow)

  • Markus Eller

    (Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB))

  • Timothy Frye

    (Columbia University and the Harriman Institute)

  • Ekaterina Zhuravskaya

    (New Economic School, CEFIR, and CEPR)

Abstract

Using survey data from 28 transition countries, we test for the complementarity and substitutability of market-relevant skills and institutions. We show that democracy and good governance complement market skills in transition economies. Under autocracy and weak governance institutions there is no significant difference in support for revising privatization between high and low-skilled respondents. As the level of democracy and the quality of governance increases, the difference in the level of support for revising privatization between the high and low skilled grows dramatically. This finding contributes to our understanding of microfoundations of the politics of economic reform.

Suggested Citation

  • Irina Denisova & Markus Eller & Timothy Frye & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2009. "Who Wants To Revise Privatization? The Complementarity of Market Skills and Institutions," Working Papers w0127, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
  • Handle: RePEc:cfr:cefirw:w0127
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Brock, Michelle, 2018. "Inequality of opportunity, governance and individual beliefs," CEPR Discussion Papers 12636, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Jain, Sanjay & Majumdar, Sumon & Mukand, Sharun W, 2014. "Walk the line: Conflict, state capacity and the political dynamics of reform," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 150-166.
    3. Denisova, Irina & Eller, Markus & Frye, Timothy & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2012. "Everyone hates privatization, but why? Survey evidence from 28 post-communist countries," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 44-61.
    4. Brock, J. Michelle, 2020. "Unfair inequality, governance and individual beliefs," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(3), pages 658-687.
    5. Irina Denisova & Markus Eller & Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 2010. "What do Russians think about transition?1," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 18(2), pages 249-280, April.
    6. Golinelli, Roberto & Rovelli, Riccardo, 2013. "Did growth and reforms increase citizens' support for the transition?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 112-137.
    7. Lakshmi Iyer & Xin Meng & Nancy Qian & Xiaoxue Zhao, 2013. "Economic Transition and Private-Sector Labor Demand: Evidence from Urban China," Harvard Business School Working Papers 14-047, Harvard Business School, revised Apr 2016.
    8. Riccardo Rovelli & Anzelika Zaiceva, 2013. "Did support for economic and political reforms increase during the post-communist transition, and if so, why?," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 21(2), pages 193-240, April.
    9. Vladan Ivanović & Vadim Kufenko & Boris Begović & Nenad Stanišić & Vincent Geloso, 2019. "Continuity Under a Different Name: The Outcome of Privatisation in Serbia," New Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 159-180, March.
    10. Aklin, Michaël & Cheng, Chao-Yo & Urpelainen, Johannes, 2018. "Social acceptance of new energy technology in developing countries: A framing experiment in rural India," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 113(C), pages 466-477.
    11. Chernykh, Lucy, 2011. "Profit or politics? Understanding renationalizations in Russia," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 1237-1253.
    12. Alexeev, Michael & Weber, Shlomo (ed.), 2013. "The Oxford Handbook of the Russian Economy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199759927.
    13. Castañeda Dower, Paul & Markevich, Andrei, 2014. "A history of resistance to privatization in Russia," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 855-873.
    14. Natalia Lamberova & Konstantin Sonin, 2018. "Economic transition and the rise of alternative institutions : Political connections in Putin's Russia," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 26(4), pages 615-648, October.
    15. Iyer, Lakshmi & Meng, Xin & Qian, Nancy & Zhao, Xiaoxue, 2019. "Economic transition and private-sector labor: Evidence from urban China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(3), pages 579-600.
    16. Jan Hagemejer & Joanna Tyrowicz, 2012. "Is the effect really so large? Firm‐level evidence on the role of FDI in a transition economy-super-1," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 20(2), pages 195-233, April.
    17. Earle, John S. & Gehlbach, Scott, 2014. "The Productivity Consequences of Political Turnover: Firm-Level Evidence from Ukraine's Orange Revolution," IZA Discussion Papers 8510, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    18. Sirovátka, Tomáš & Guzi, Martin & Saxonberg, Steve, 2019. "Support for Market Economy Principles in European Post-Communist Countries during 1999–2008," MPRA Paper 97585, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Cancho,Cesar A. & Davalos,Maria Eugenia & Sanchez,Carolina, 2015. "Why so gloomy ? perceptions of economic mobility in Europe and Central Asia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7519, The World Bank.
    20. Irina Denisova, 2016. "Institutions and the support for market reforms," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 258-258, May.
    21. Di Tella, Rafael & Galiani, Sebastian & Schargrodsky, Ernesto, 2012. "Reality versus propaganda in the formation of beliefs about privatization," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(5), pages 553-567.

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    JEL classification:

    • J2 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor
    • O0 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General
    • P0 - Economic Systems - - General

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