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Zur Akzeptanz politischer und marktwirtschaftlicher Reformen in Osteuropa: Empirische Befunde und Erklärungsansätze

  • Jürgen Jerger



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    In the transformation economies of Eastern Europe a rather high level of institutional heterogeneity developed after having started at low, albeit quite similar levels after the fall of the Iron Curtain. This heterogeneity is relevant both at the level of the major macroeconomic indicators and the level of indicators of institutional reforms and the resulting institutional quality. It is remarkable that political and economic liberty did not develop in lockstep as could have been expected from Walter Eucken’s reflections on the interdependency of orders. In this contribution, some conceptual remarks are made on the role of the acceptance of economic and political systems. After that, we look at macro- and microeconomic datasets in order to describe the situation in the transformation economies.

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    Paper provided by Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies) in its series Working Papers with number 315.

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    Length: 32
    Date of creation: May 2012
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ost:wpaper:315
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    1. Denisova, Irina & Eller, Markus & Frye, Timothy & Zhuravskaya, Ekaterina, 2007. "Who Wants to Revise Privatization and Why? Evidence from 28 Post-Communist Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 6603, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Saul Estrin & Jan Hanousek & Evzen Kocenda & Jan Svejnar, 2009. "The Effects of Privatization and Ownership in Transition Economies," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(3), pages 699-728, September.
    3. Philippe Aghion & Olivier J. Blanchard, 1994. "On the Speed of Transition in Central Europe," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1994, Volume 9, pages 283-330 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Elias Papaioannou & Gregorios Siourounis, 2008. "Democratization and Growth," Working Papers 00027, University of Peloponnese, Department of Economics.
    5. David Aristei & Cristiano Perugini, 2011. "Speed and Sequencing of Transition Reforms and Income Inequality: a Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers 302, Institut für Ost- und Südosteuropaforschung (Institute for East and South-East European Studies).
    6. Jeffry M. Netter & William L. Megginson, 2001. "From State to Market: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Privatization," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 321-389, June.
    7. Apolte, Thomas, 2010. "Democracy and prosperity in two decades of transition," CAWM Discussion Papers 26, Center of Applied Economic Research Münster (CAWM), University of Münster.
    8. Philippe Aghion & Olivier Jean Blanchard, 1994. "On the Speed of Transition Central Europe," NBER Working Papers 4736, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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