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Can Biased Polls Distort Electoral Results? Evidence from the Lab and the Field

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  • Aristotelis Boukouras
  • Will Jennings
  • Lunzheng Li
  • Zacharias Maniadis

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  • Aristotelis Boukouras & Will Jennings & Lunzheng Li & Zacharias Maniadis, 2019. "Can Biased Polls Distort Electoral Results? Evidence from the Lab and the Field," Levine's Working Paper Archive 786969000000001528, David K. Levine.
  • Handle: RePEc:cla:levarc:786969000000001528
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    4. Marina Agranov & Jacob K Goeree & Julian Romero & Leeat Yariv, 2018. "What Makes Voters Turn Out: The Effects of Polls and Beliefs," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 825-856.
    5. Tito Boeri & Prachi Mishra & Chris Papageorgiou & Antonio Spilimbergo, 2018. "A Dialogue between a Populist and an Economist," AEA Papers and Proceedings, American Economic Association, vol. 108, pages 191-195, May.
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    10. Cipullo, Davide & Reslow, André, 2019. "Biased Forecasts to Affect Voting Decisions? The Brexit Case," Working Paper Series 364, Sveriges Riksbank (Central Bank of Sweden).
    11. Alan Gerber & Mitchell Hoffman & John Morgan & Collin Raymond, 2020. "One in a Million: Field Experiments on Perceived Closeness of the Election and Voter Turnout," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 287-325, July.
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