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Do Polls Reflect Opinions or Do Opinions Reflect Polls? The Impact of Political Polling on Voters' Expectations, Preferences, and Behavior

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  • Morwitz, Vicki G
  • Pluzinski, Carol

Abstract

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  • Morwitz, Vicki G & Pluzinski, Carol, 1996. " Do Polls Reflect Opinions or Do Opinions Reflect Polls? The Impact of Political Polling on Voters' Expectations, Preferences, and Behavior," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 23(1), pages 53-67, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jconrs:v:23:y:1996:i:1:p:53-67
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/209466
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    Cited by:

    1. Bischoff, Ivo & Egbert, Henrik, 2013. "Social information and bandwagon behavior in voting: An economic experiment," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 270-284.
    2. Patrick Hummel, 2014. "Pre-election polling and third party candidates," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 42(1), pages 77-98, January.
    3. Beatrice Scheubel & Daniel Schunk & Joachim Winter, 2009. "Don't Raise the Retirement Age! An Experiment on Opposition to Pension Reforms and East-West Differences in Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 2752, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. J. Edward Russo & Jonathan C. Corbin, 2016. "Not by desire alone: The role of cognitive consistency in the desirability bias," Judgment and Decision Making, Society for Judgment and Decision Making, vol. 11(5), pages 449-459, September.
    5. Zacharias Maniadis, 2014. "Selective revelation of public information and self-confirming equilibrium," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, vol. 43(4), pages 991-1008, November.
    6. Áron Kiss & Gábor Simonovits, 2014. "Identifying the bandwagon effect in two-round elections," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 160(3), pages 327-344, September.
    7. Liu, Longzhu & Chen, Rong & He, Feng, 2015. "How to promote purchase of carbon offset products: Labeling vs. calculation?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 942-948.
    8. Ronald McDonald & Xuxin Mao, 2015. "Forecasting the 2015 General Election with Internet Big Data: An Application of the TRUST Framework," Working Papers 2016_03, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.

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