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A Dialogue between a Populist and an Economist

Author

Listed:
  • Boeri, Tito
  • Mishra, Prachi
  • Papageorgiou, Chris
  • Spilimbergo, Antonio

Abstract

In this imaginary dialogue, a populist and an economist discuss the role of economic shocks to explain populism. A simple correlation between economic shocks and populism is weak. However, economic shocks can explain well the phenomenon of populism in countries with low pre-existent level of trust. This is confirmed both at the macro cross-country level and also by micro evidence obtained from surveys. Finally, this finding is consistent with the "ideational approach" in political science, which emphasizes how the populist narrative opposes the "corrupt elite" to the "virtuous people."

Suggested Citation

  • Boeri, Tito & Mishra, Prachi & Papageorgiou, Chris & Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2018. "A Dialogue between a Populist and an Economist," CEPR Discussion Papers 12763, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:12763
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guiso, Luigi & Herrera, Helios & Morelli, Massimo & Sonno, Tommaso, 2017. "Demand and Supply of Populism," CEPR Discussion Papers 11871, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Inglehart, Ronald F. & Norris, Pippa, 2016. "Trump, Brexit, and the Rise of Populism: Economic Have-Nots and Cultural Backlash," Working Paper Series 16-026, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
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    Cited by:

    1. Eugenio Levi & Isabelle Sin & Steven Stillman, 2021. "Understanding the Origins of Populist Political Parties and the Role of External Shocks," CESifo Working Paper Series 9036, CESifo.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Europe; Political parties; populism;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General
    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines

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