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oTree - An Open-Source Platform for Laboratory, Online, and Field Experiments

Author

Listed:
  • Chen, Daniel Li
  • Schonger, Martin
  • Wickens, Chris

Abstract

oTree is an open-source and online software for implementing interactive experiments in the laboratory, online, the field or combinations thereof. oTree does not require installation of software on subjects’ devices; it can run on any device that has a web browser, be that a desktop computer, a tablet or a smartphone. Deployment can be internet-based without a shared local network, or local-network-based even without internet access. For coding, Python is used, a popular, open-source programming language. www.oTree.org provides the source code, a library of standard game templates and demo games which can be played by anyone.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Daniel Li & Schonger, Martin & Wickens, Chris, 2015. "oTree - An Open-Source Platform for Laboratory, Online, and Field Experiments," MPRA Paper 62730, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:62730
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    experimental economics; software; laboratory experiments; field experiments; online experiments; classroom experiments;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • A20 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - General
    • C88 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Other Computer Software
    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General

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