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Labor Responses, Regulation and Business Churn

Author

Listed:
  • Marta Aloi
  • Huw D. Dixon
  • Anthony Savagar

Abstract

We develop a model of sluggish firm entry to explain short-run labor responses to technology shocks. We show that the labor response to technology and its persistence depend on the degree of returns to labor and the rate of firm entry. Existing empirical results support our theory based on short-run labor responses across US industries. We derive closed-form transition paths that show the result occurs because labor adjusts instantaneously whilst firms are sluggish, and closed-form eigenvalues show that stricter entry regulation results in slower convergence to steady state.

Suggested Citation

  • Marta Aloi & Huw D. Dixon & Anthony Savagar, 2018. "Labor Responses, Regulation and Business Churn," CESifo Working Paper Series 7275, CESifo Group Munich.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_7275
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Anthony Savagar, 2018. "Measured Productivity with Endogenous Markups and Economic Profits," Studies in Economics 1812, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    deregulation; dynamic entry; endogenous entry costs;

    JEL classification:

    • D25 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice: Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • E20 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - General (includes Measurement and Data)
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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