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Optimal Stabilization Policy With Search Externalities

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  • Berentsen, Aleksander
  • Waller, Christopher

Abstract

We study optimal monetary stabilization policy in a DSGE model with microfounded money demand. A search externality creates “congestion,†which causes aggregate output to be inefficient. Because of the informational frictions that give rise to money, households are unable to insure themselves perfectly against aggregate shocks. This gives rise to a welfare-improving role for monetary policy that works by adjusting the nominal interest rate in response to these shocks. Optimal policy is determined by choosing a set of state-contingent nominal interest rates to maximize the expected lifetime utility of the agents subject to the constraints of being an equilibrium.

Suggested Citation

  • Berentsen, Aleksander & Waller, Christopher, 2015. "Optimal Stabilization Policy With Search Externalities," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 19(3), pages 669-700, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:macdyn:v:19:y:2015:i:03:p:669-700_00
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. Florin O. Bilbiie & Fabio Ghironi & Marc J. Melitz, 2008. "Monetary Policy and Business Cycles with Endogenous Entry and Product Variety," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2007, Volume 22, pages 299-353 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Liu, Lucy Qian & Wang, Liang & Wright, Randall, 2011. "On The “Hot Potato” Effect Of Inflation: Intensive Versus Extensive Margins," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S2), pages 191-216, September.
    5. Lewis, Vivien, 2013. "Optimal Monetary Policy And Firm Entry," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 17(08), pages 1687-1710, December.
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    7. Isabel Correia & Juan Pablo Nicolini & Pedro Teles, 2008. "Optimal Fiscal and Monetary Policy: Equivalence Results," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 116(1), pages 141-170, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lukas Altermatt, 2017. "Inside money, investment, and unconventional monetary policy," ECON - Working Papers 247, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Jul 2019.
    2. Huw Dixon & ANTHONY SAVAGAR, 2017. "The Effect of Firm Entry on Capacity Utilization and Macroeconomic Productivity," 2017 Meeting Papers 1130, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    3. Fan, Haichao & Gao, Xiang & Xu, Juanyi & Xu, Zhiwei, 2016. "News shock, firm dynamics and business cycles: Evidence and theory," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 159-180.
    4. Mohammed Aït Lahcen, 2017. "Informality and the long run Phillips curve," ECON - Working Papers 248, Department of Economics - University of Zurich, revised Dec 2018.
    5. Marta Aloi & Huw D. Dixon & Anthony Savagar, 2018. "Labor Responses, Regulation and Business Churn," CESifo Working Paper Series 7275, CESifo Group Munich.
    6. Jeong, Minhyeon, 2015. "Optimal policy in an economy with human capital where money is essential," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 103-107.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E00 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - General
    • E40 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - General

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