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Green Skills

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Vona
  • Giovanni Marin
  • Davide Consoli
  • David Popp

Abstract

The catchword ‘green skills’ has been common parlance in policy circles for a while, yet there is little systematic empirical research to guide public intervention for meeting the demand for skills that will be needed to operate and develop green technology. The present paper proposes a data-driven methodology to identify green skills and to gauge the ways in which the demand for these competences responds to environmental regulation. Accordingly, we find that green skills are high-level analytical and technical know-how related to the design, production, management and monitoring of technology. The empirical analysis reveals that environmental regulation triggers technological and organizational changes that increase the demand for hard technical, engineering and scientific skills. Our analysis suggests also that this is not just a compositional change in skill demand due to job losses in sectors highly exposed to trade and regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Vona & Giovanni Marin & Davide Consoli & David Popp, 2015. "Green Skills," CESifo Working Paper Series 5323, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_5323
    as

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    File URL: https://www.cesifo.org/DocDL/cesifo1_wp5323.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francesco Vona & Davide Consoli, 2015. "Innovation and skill dynamics: a life-cycle approach," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(6), pages 1393-1415.
    2. W. Reed Walker, 2013. "The Transitional Costs of Sectoral Reallocation: Evidence From the Clean Air Act and the Workforce," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 128(4), pages 1787-1835.
    3. Douglas Staiger & James H. Stock, 1997. "Instrumental Variables Regression with Weak Instruments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 65(3), pages 557-586, May.
    4. W. Reed Walker, 2011. "Environmental Regulation and Labor Reallocation: Evidence from the Clean Air Act," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(3), pages 442-447, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Vona & Giovanni Marin & Davide Consoli, 2019. "Measures, drivers and effects of green employment: evidence from US local labor markets, 2006–2014," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(5), pages 1021-1048.
    2. Bernhard Dachs & Martin Hud & Christian Koehler & Bettina Peters, 2017. "Innovation, creative destruction and structural change: firm-level evidence from European countries," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 346-381, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    green skills; environmental regulation; task model; workforce composition; structural shocks;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • Q52 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Pollution Control Adoption and Costs; Distributional Effects; Employment Effects

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