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Is the Sky the Limit? An Analysis of High-Rise Office Buildings

  • Hans R. A. Koster
  • Piet Rietveld
  • Jos N. van Ommerren

Modern central business districts are characterised by high-rise office buildings. Helsley and Strange (2008) argue that skyscrapers are caused by agglomeration economies and a prize for being the tallest, so a reputation effect. We aim to test the relevance of this model by investigating the impact of building height on commercial office rents. The results show that firms are willing to pay about 4 percent more for a building that is 10 meters taller, which we interpret as the sum of a within-building agglomeration effect and a reputation effect. Using semiparametric techniques, we disentangle reputation effects from agglomeration effects and demonstrate that the reputation effect is substantial for tall buildings. For example, it is at least 17.5 percent of the rent for a building that is 6 times the average height.

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Paper provided by Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE in its series SERC Discussion Papers with number 0086.

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Date of creation: Jul 2011
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Handle: RePEc:cep:sercdp:0086
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk/SERC/publications/default.asp

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  1. Eva Gutiérrez‐i‐Puigarnau & Jos N. Van Ommeren, 2011. "Welfare Effects Of Distortionary Fringe Benefits Taxation: The Case Of Employer‐Provided Cars," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 52(4), pages 1105-1122, November.
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  26. Cheshire, Paul & Hilber, Christian A. L., 2007. "Office Space Supply Restrictions in Britain: The Political Economy of Market Revenge," MPRA Paper 5435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  27. Robert W. Helsley & William C. Strange, 2007. "Urban interactions and spatial structure," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(2), pages 119-138, March.
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