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Planning and economic performance

In: Urban Economics and Urban Policy

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    In this bold, exciting and readable volume, Paul Cheshire, Max Nathan and Henry Overman illustrate the insights that recent economic research brings to our understanding of cities, and the lessons for urban policy-making. The authors present new evidence on the fundamental importance of cities to economic wellbeing and to the enrichment of our lives. They also argue that many policies have been trying to push water uphill and have done little to achieve their stated aims; or, worse, have had unintended and counterproductive consequences.

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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781781952511.00014.xml
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    This chapter was published in:
  • Paul C. Cheshire & Max Nathan & Henry G. Overman, 2014. "Urban Economics and Urban Policy," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 15105.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 15105_5.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:15105_5
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    1. Cheshire, Paul & Sheppard, Stephen, 2002. "The welfare economics of land use planning," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(2), pages 242-269, September.
    2. Paul C. Cheshire & Christian A.L. Hilber, 2008. "Office Space Supply Restrictions in Britain: The Political Economy of Market Revenge," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(529), pages 185-221, 06.
    3. Michael Ball, 2011. "Planning Delay and the Responsiveness of English Housing Supply," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 48(2), pages 349-362, February.
    4. Paul Cheshire & Stefano Magrini, 2009. "Urban growth drivers in a Europe of sticky people and implicit boundaries," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 9(1), pages 85-115, January.
    5. Jorge De La Roca & Diego Puga, 2017. "Learning by Working in Big Cities," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(1), pages 106-142.
    6. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon, 2011. "The identification of agglomeration economies," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-266, March.
    7. Christian A. L. Hilber & Wouter Vermeulen, 2016. "The Impact of Supply Constraints on House Prices in England," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(591), pages 358-405, 03.
    8. Gilles Duranton & Diego Puga, 2001. "Nursery Cities: Urban Diversity, Process Innovation, and the Life Cycle of Products," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(5), pages 1454-1477, December.
    9. Barrie Needham & Erik Louw, 2006. "Institutional Economics and Policies for Changing Land Markets: The Case of Industrial Estates in the Netherlands," Journal of Property Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(1), pages 75-90, March.
    10. Mayo, Stephen & Sheppard, Stephen, 2001. "Housing Supply and the Effects of Stochastic Development Control," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 109-128, June.
    11. Paul C. Cheshire & Christian A. L. Hilber & Ioannis Kaplanis, 2015. "Land use regulation and productivity—land matters: evidence from a UK supermarket chain," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(1), pages 43-73.
    12. Hans R. A. Koster & Piet Rietveld & Jos N. van Ommerren, 2011. "Is the Sky the Limit? An Analysis of High-Rise Office Buildings," SERC Discussion Papers 0086, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    13. Unsworth, Rachael & Nathan, Max, 2006. "Beyond City Living: Remaking the Inner Suburbs," MPRA Paper 29487, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Stephen Gibbons & Susana Mourato & Guilherme Resende, 2014. "The Amenity Value of English Nature: A Hedonic Price Approach," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 57(2), pages 175-196, February.
    15. Melo, Patricia C. & Graham, Daniel J. & Noland, Robert B., 2009. "A meta-analysis of estimates of urban agglomeration economies," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 332-342, May.
    16. Paul C. Cheshire & Christian A. L. Hilber & Ioannis Kaplanis, 2012. "Evidence from a UK supermarket chain," Working Papers 2012/15, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    17. Stephen Gibbons & Henry G. Overman & Panu Pelkonen, 2014. "Area Disparities in Britain: Understanding the Contribution of People vs. Place Through Variance Decompositions," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(5), pages 745-763, October.
    18. Cheshire, Paul & Sheppard, Stephen, 2004. "Land markets and land market regulation: progress towards understanding," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(6), pages 619-637, November.
    19. H. W. Richardson, 1962. "The Basis of Economic Recovery in the Nineteen- Thirties: A Review and a New Interpretation," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 15(2), pages 344-363, December.
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