IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/cdl/ucscec/qt4716p3vr.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Punjab’s Agricultural Innovation Challenge

Author

Listed:
  • Singh, Nirvikar

Abstract

Fifty years ago, Punjab embarked on its famous Green Revolution, leading the rest of India in that innovation, and becoming the country's breadbasket. Now its economy and society are struggling by relative, and sometimes even absolute, measures. Using the original Green Revolution as a benchmark, this paper discusses five areas of challenge and promise for a new round of agricultural innovation in Punjab. These are: complexity of the agricultural economy, complementary inputs such as infrastructure, switching costs (including risks), balancing frontier innovation and adaptation, and the relative roles of the public and private sectors.

Suggested Citation

  • Singh, Nirvikar, 2015. "Punjab’s Agricultural Innovation Challenge," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt4716p3vr, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdl:ucscec:qt4716p3vr
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4716p3vr.pdf;origin=repeccitec
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Shawn Cole & Xavier Gine & Jeremy Tobacman & Petia Topalova & Robert Townsend & James Vickery, 2013. "Barriers to Household Risk Management: Evidence from India," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 104-135, January.
    2. Paul Klemperer, 1987. "Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 102(2), pages 375-394.
    3. Sukhpal Singh, 2013. "Post-Green Revolution Agro-entrepreneurship among Capitalist Farmers in Indian Punjab and Andhra Pradesh," The Journal of Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India, vol. 22(2), pages 161-180, September.
    4. Evens Salies, 2012. "Product Innovation when Consumers have Switching Costs," Chapters, in: Michael Dietrich & Jackie Krafft (ed.), Handbook on the Economics and Theory of the Firm, chapter 31, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/5l6uh8ogmqildh09h56210pa6 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Evens Salies, 2011. "Product innovation when consumers have switching costs," Working Papers hal-01069477, HAL.
    7. Daron Acemoglu & Davide Ticchi & Andrea Vindigni, 2011. "Emergence And Persistence Of Inefficient States," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 177-208, April.
    8. McGuirk, Anya & Mundlak, Yair, 1991. "Incentives and constraints in the transformation of Punjab agriculture:," Research reports 87, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Beggs, Alan, 1989. "A Note on Switching Costs and Technology Choice," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(4), pages 437-440, June.
    10. Kohli, Inderjit & Singh, Nirvikar, 1999. "Rent Seeking and Rent Setting with Asymmetric Effectiveness of Lobbying," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 99(3-4), pages 275-298, June.
    11. Singh, Sukhpal, 2002. "Contracting Out Solutions: Political Economy of Contract Farming in the Indian Punjab," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 30(9), pages 1621-1638, September.
    12. Devesh Kapur, 2010. "Diaspora, Development, and Democracy: The Domestic Impact of International Migration from India," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9202.
    13. Raabe, Katharina, 2008. "Reforming the agricultural extension system in India: What do we know about what works where and why?," IFPRI discussion papers 775, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    14. Klemperer, Paul D, 1987. "Entry Deterrence in Markets with Consumer Switching Costs," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388a), pages 99-117, Supplemen.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social and Behavioral Sciences; Punjab; agriculture; innovation; switching costs; infrastructure;

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • P16 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Political Economy of Capitalism
    • P26 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Political Economy
    • Q10 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cdl:ucscec:qt4716p3vr. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Lisa Schiff). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ecucsus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.