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Access to Financial Services and Working Poverty in Developing Countries

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  • Aïssata COULIBALY
  • Urbain Thierry YOGO

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of access to financial services on the prevalence of working poor. Using a panel of 63 developing countries over the period 2004-2013, we find that improving financial access (as measured by the number of bank branches per 100,000 adults) reduces the prevalence of working poor (workers living with less than US$ 1.25 a day). This effect is even more relevant in countries affected by strong macroeconomic instability. Our findings are robust to endogeneity bias, the addition of various controls including remittances and mobile phone subscriptions, and to the shifting of the poverty line from US$ 1.25 to US$ 1.90. We also show that barriers to use banking services are correlated positively with working poverty. Moreover, our results confirm the validity of some transmissions channels such as growth (trickle-down effect) and the access of the non-poor workers to financial services, suggesting that improving financial access for the excluded non-poor can have a strong reducing-effect on working poverty.

Suggested Citation

  • Aïssata COULIBALY & Urbain Thierry YOGO, 2016. "Access to Financial Services and Working Poverty in Developing Countries," Working Papers 201620, CERDI.
  • Handle: RePEc:cdi:wpaper:1833
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gine, Xavier & Townsend, Robert M., 2004. "Evaluation of financial liberalization: a general equilibrium model with constrained occupation choice," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 269-307, August.
    2. Fields, Gary S., 2012. "Working Hard, Working Poor: A Global Journey," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199794645.
    3. De Gregorio, Jose, 1996. "Borrowing constraints, human capital accumulation, and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 49-71, February.
    4. Sylviane Guillaumont Jeanneney & Kangni Kpodar, 2011. "Financial Development and Poverty Reduction: Can There be a Benefit without a Cost?," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 143-163.
    5. Jean-Louis Combes & Christian Hubert Ebeke & Mathilde Maurel & Thierry Urbain Yogo, 2014. "Remittances and Working Poverty," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(10), pages 1348-1361, November.
    6. Sylviane GUILLAUMONT JEANNENEY & Kangni KPODAR, 2004. "Développement financier, instabilité financière et réduction de la pauvreté," Working Papers 200429, CERDI.
    7. Thorsten Beck & Chen Lin & Yue Ma, 2014. "Why Do Firms Evade Taxes? The Role of Information Sharing and Financial Sector Outreach," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 69(2), pages 763-817, April.
    8. Takeshi Inoue & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2012. "How has financial deepening affected poverty reduction in India? Empirical analysis using state-level panel data," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(5), pages 395-408, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial access; Working poverty; Trickle-down effect.;

    JEL classification:

    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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