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Financial development, institutions, and poverty alleviation: an empirical analysis

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  • Alessandra Cepparulo
  • Juan Carlos Cuestas
  • Maurizio Intartaglia

Abstract

The aim of this article is to analyse empirically whether the level of institutional quality influences how financial development affects poverty for a sample of developing countries covering the period from 1984 to 2012. Using an interaction term constructed as a product between financial development and institutional quality we find that the pro-poor impact of financial development decreases as the quality of institutions rises. Such a differential effect can be ascribed to the capacity of banks to provide functions that mimic those performed by an institutional framework that works well. The results of this article can be used for policy management.

Suggested Citation

  • Alessandra Cepparulo & Juan Carlos Cuestas & Maurizio Intartaglia, 2017. "Financial development, institutions, and poverty alleviation: an empirical analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(36), pages 3611-3622, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:49:y:2017:i:36:p:3611-3622
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2016.1265074
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Punnoose Jacob & Lenno Uuskula, 2016. "Deep habits and exchange rate pass-through," CAMA Working Papers 2016-17, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    2. repec:eee:finana:v:56:y:2018:i:c:p:253-263 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D8 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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